Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese.

But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli.

Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Different Conditions

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Related ICD 10 COde
ICD 10 Code A04

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Related ICD 10 COde
ICD 10 Code A42.1

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Related ICD 10 COde
ICD 10 Code A42

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Abbreviated Terms

  • bacillus; fragilis, as cause of disease classified elsewhere
  • Also Known As

  • B. fragilis as the cause of diseases classified to other chapters
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B96.6

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A46

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    Bacterial foodborne intoxications

    A condition caused by an infection with the gram-positive bacteria Clostridium perfringens. This condition is characterized by a sudden onset of colic, followed by diarrhoea or abdominal cramps. Transmission is by ingestion of contaminated food. Confirmation is by isolation of 1 000 000 spores of Clostridium perfringens per gram faeces.

    Additional Information

    This refers to a gastrointestinal illness caused by eating foods contaminated with toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens [Clostridium welchii], characterized by sudden onset of colic followed by diarrhoea; nausea is common, vomiting and fever are usually absent. Generally a mild disease of short duration- 1 day or less ??????ǣ and rarely fatal in previously healthy people.

    Organ Affected

    Entire intestine (body structure)

    Causes

    Food-borne transmission (qualifier value)|Clostridium perfringens (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • enteritis necroticans
  • Also Known As

  • foodborne Clostridium welchii intoxication
  • foodborne intoxication due to Clostridium perfringens
  • foodborne intoxication due to Clostridium welchii
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A05.2

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    Abbreviated Terms

  • Borreliosis in myelitis associated with mycoplasma pneumoniae infection
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A49.3

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    Bartonellosis

    Bacillary angiomatosis is a disease seen in immunosuppressed individuals due to proliferation of Bartonella species (Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana). It was initially described in persons infected with HIV. Skin involvement resembles Kaposi sarcoma. It can affect other organs including the respiratory tract, bone, lymph nodes, gastrointestinal tract, and brain. Liver involvement produces so-called bacillary peliosis or peliosis hepatis. Symptoms depend on the anatomical site involved and may include fever, tender lymphadenopathy, and skin lesions.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A44

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    Brucellosis

    Brucella melitensis is non-motile, Gram-negative, aerobic, unencapsulated

    Abbreviated Terms

  • cyprus fever
  • mountain fever
  • neapolitan fever
  • Gibraltar fever
  • melitensis febris
  • Also Known As

  • infection due to brucella melitensis
  • brucellosis melitensis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A23.0

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    Carri???n disease

    A disease commonly caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Bartonella bacilliformis. This disease is characterized by severe haemolytic anaemia and transient immunosuppression. This disease may present with fever, malaise, or jaundice. Transmission is through the bite of infected sandflies from the genus Lutzomyia. Confirmation is by identification of Bartonella bacilliformis in a blood sample.

    Additional Information

    Oroya fever is a bacteraemic form of infection with Bartonella bacilliformis. Transmission is by bite from an infected Lutzomyia sand-fly, a type found only in the high Andes (>1000 metres). There is an incubation period of 3-12 weeks. The illness may range from mild to very severe. In severe cases, fever, chills, headache, sweating, aches, dyspnoea, confusion and seizures may occur.

    Causes

    Genus Felis (organism)|Subfamily Felinae (organism)|Family Felidae (organism)|Felis silvestris (organism)|Genus Bartonella (organism)

    Also Known As

  • Systemic bartonellosis due to Bartonella bacilliformis
  • Systemic Carri???n disease
  • systemic bartonellosis
  • Bartonella fever
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A44.0

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    Abbreviated Terms

  • carrier of meningococci
  • carrier of staphylococci
  • carrier of streptococci
  • Also Known As

  • carrier of other specified bacterial diseases
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code Z22.3

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    Certain zoonotic bacterial diseases

    Any disease caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Streptobacillus moniliformis or gram-negative bacteria Spirillum minus. This disease presents with symptoms depending on the bacterial agent. Transmission is through the bite of an infected rat or rodent.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Rattus norvegicus (organism)|Bacterium (organism)|Superkingdom Bacteria (organism)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A25

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    Certain zoonotic bacterial infections involving the skin

    A disease caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Leptospira. In the first phase, this disease is characterized by generalised illness (fever, chills, or myalgias) or individuals may be asymptomatic; in the second phase, the heart, liver, kidneys, or brain may be affected by the infection (symptoms are dependent on the site affected). Transmission is by ingestion of contaminated food or water, droplet transmission, or direct cutaneous contact. Confirmation is by identification of Leptospira in samples from the affected individual.

    Additional Information

    Leptospirosis is a disease that is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Leptospirosis is transmitted via direct contact with the body fluid of an acutely infected animal or by exposure to soil or fresh water contaminated with the urine of an animal that is a chronic carrier.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Phylum Spirochaetes (organism)|Order Spirochaetales (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • aseptic leptospiral meningitis
  • leptospiral meningitis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A27

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    Cutaneous erysipeloid

    Multiple lesions similar to those seen in localized cutaneous erysipeloid (qv) occur disseminated over the body surface. This form is less common than the localized form.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Also Known As

  • Diffuse cutaneous erysipeloid
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A26

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A46

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    Erysipeloid

    A skin infection due to the bacterium Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. It is most commonly due to direct trauma allowing the bacterium to enter the skin from infected meat. Rarely the infection may become disseminated over the skin surface with multiple lesions.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A26

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    Gastroenteritis and colitis of infectious origin

    Any condition of the intestines, caused by an infection with a bacterial source.

    Organ Affected

    Entire intestine (body structure)

    Causes

    Bacterium (organism)|Superkingdom Bacteria (organism)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A04

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    Abbreviated Terms

  • Proteus mirabilis as the cause of diseases classified to other chapters
  • Proteus morganii as the cause of diseases classified to other chapters
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B96.4

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    Infections due to Actinomyces

    A disease commonly caused by an infection with the gram-positive bacteria Actinomyces. This disease is characterized by painful abscesses in the mouth, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract. Transmission is by endogenous infection. Confirmation is by identification of Actinomyces in infected tissue or fluid samples.

    Additional Information

    A chronic infective disease, most frequently localized in the jaw, thorax or abdomen in which fermentative actinomycetes of the genera Actinomyces (especially A. israelii and A. gerencseriae), Propionibacterium and Bifidobacterium act as the principal pathogens.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • actinomycotic node
  • Also Known As

  • actinomyces infection
  • actinomycotic infection
  • actinomycotic infection of unspecified site
  • actinomycosis NOS
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A42

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A49.3

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    Infections due to Brucella

    A disease caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Brucella. This disease is characterized by fever, muscular pain, or sweating. Transmission is by ingestion of unpasteurized milk and soft cheeses made from infected animals. Confirmation is by identification of Brucella or antibodies to Brucella.

    Additional Information

    A systemic bacterial disease of acute or insidious onset caused by bacteria of the genus brucella. Common symptoms include fever, sweats, headaches, back pains, and physical weakness.

    Causes

    Bruccella bacteria

    Abbreviated Terms

  • brucella spondylitis
  • Also Known As

  • Malta fever
  • Mediterranean fever
  • undulant fever
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A23

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    Infections due to Burkholderia pseudomallei

    A disease caused by the saprophytic environmental gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei which is found in soil or water in humid tropical regions of the world, especially South-East Asia and northern Australia. It has protean manifestations ranging from fulminant septicaemia with fatal outcome to chronic low grade infection.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A24

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    Infections due to Chlamydia

    Any condition caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Chlamydia psittaci. These conditions are characterized by variable clinical presentations such as fever, cough, headaches, chills, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, or pneumonia. Transmission is commonly by inhalation of aersol contaminated with body fluids from infected birds, or direct contact with infected birds. Confirmation is by identification of Chlamydia psittaci.

    Causes

    Chlamydophila psittaci (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Ornithosis
  • Parrot fever
  • chlamydophila psittaci infection
  • Also Known As

  • Psittacosis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A70

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    Infections due to Coxiella

    A disease caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Coxiella burnetti. This disease is characterized by fever, or may be asymptomatic. Transmission is by inhalation of the bacteria, contact with contaminated milk, urine, faeces, vaginal mucus, or semen of infected animals, or through the bite of an infected tick.

    Additional Information

    An acute febrile disease; onset may be sudden with chills, retrobulbar headache, weakness, malaise and severe sweats. There is considerable variation in severity and duration; infection may be inapparent or present as a nonspecific fever of unknown origin.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Fever (finding)
  • Causes

    Coxiella burnetii (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Infection due to Coxiella burnetii
  • Quadrilateral fever
  • cardiac Q fever
  • Q fever endocarditis
  • Also Known As

  • Nine Mile fever
  • balkan grippe
  • Australian Q fever
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A78

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    Infections due to Erysipelothrix

    A disease caused by an infection with the gram-positive bacteria Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. This disease is characterized by localized cellulitis. Transmission is by direct cutaneous contact with Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, often in individuals handling seafood and raw meat.

    Causes

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (organism)

    Also Known As

  • Erysipelothrix infection
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A26

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    Infections due to Francisella

    A disease caused by an infection with Francisella tularensis. This disease is characterised by fever, chills, headache, and weakness, as well as other symptoms depending on the route of infection. Transmission is through the bite of an infected tick or deer fly, by ingestion of contaminated water or food, airborne transmission, or by direct contact with infected animals. Confirmation is by identification of Francisella tularensis, or the presence of antibodies to Francisella tularensis, in a blood or sputum sample.

    Causes

    Francisella tularensis (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • infection due to Francisella tularensis
  • Also Known As

  • deer-fly fever
  • rabbit fever
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A21

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A49.3

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A49.3

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    Infections due to Nocardia

    A disease caused by an infection with the gram-positive bacteria Nocardia. This disease presents with symptoms depending on the site of infection (commonly lung, brain, or skin). Transmission is by inhalation of Nocardia from soil or water, or by direct cutaneous contact. Confirmation is by identification of Nocardia in samples from affected sites.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A43

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    Infections due to non-influenzae Haemophilus

    A disease affecting children, caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Haemophilus aegyptius. This disease is characterized by fever, nausea, vomiting, purpuric lesions, and sepsis, that is preceded by conjunctivitis. Transmission may be by mechanical transmission from infected eye gnats, contact with discharge from infected individuals, or fomites used near the eyes. Confirmation is by identification of Haemophilus influenzae from blood.

    Additional Information

    This is an illness of children caused by the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius which is ultimately fatal due to sepsis.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Purpuric disorder (disorder)
  • Purpura (finding)
  • Purpura (morphologic abnormality)
  • Fever (finding)
  • Causes

    Bacterium (organism)|Superkingdom Bacteria (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Systemic Haemophilus aegyptius infection
  • Also Known As

  • BPF - [Brazillian purpuric fever] clone conjunctivitis
  • BPF - [Brazilian purpuric fever]
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A48.4

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    Infections due to Pasteurella

    A disease caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Pasteurella. This disease is characterised by local cellulitis and may lead to other clinical signs depending on the route of infection. Transmission is commonly by direct contact through the bite, scratch, or lick from an infected animal, inhalation of infected respiratory secretions, or ingestion of contaminated meat. Confirmation is by identification of Pasteurella from the affected individual.

    Additional Information

    Pasteurella multocida is the most common organism involved in human infection. These organisms are normal inhabitants in the mouths of dogs, cats and other animals. Infection follows a bite or lick. Infections include cellulitis, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis and meningitis.

    Also Known As

  • pasteurella infection
  • shipping fever
  • transport fever
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A28.0

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    Infections due to Shigella

    A disease caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Shigella. This disease is characterized by an acute onset of small volume diarrhoea, accompanied by fever and nausea. This disease may also present with toxaemia, vomiting, cramps, and tenesmus. Transmission is by ingestion of contaminated food, or direct contact. Confirmation is by identification of Shigella in a faecal sample.

    Additional Information

    An acute bacterial disease involving the distal small intestine and colon, characterized by loose stools of small volume accompanied by fever, nausea and sometimes toxoemia, vomiting, cramps and tenesmus.

    Organ Affected

    Entire intestine (body structure)

    Causes

    Genus Shigella (organism)

    Also Known As

  • shigellosis
  • bacillary dysentery NOS
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A03

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    Infections due to Yersinia enterocolitica

    A disease caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Yersinia enterocolitica, excluding infections in the intestinal tract. This disease presents with symptoms depending on the site of infection, and may lead to a systemic infection. Transmission is by the faecal-oral route from the ingestion of contaminated food or water, or direct contact with infected animals or humans. Confirmation is by identification of Yersinia enterocolitica from affected tissues.

    Causes

    Genus Yersinia (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • infection by pasteurella pseudotuberculosis
  • infection by yersinia pseudotuberculosis
  • pseudotuberculosis
  • rodent pseudotuberculosis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A28.2

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    Infections of the fetus or newborn

    This category includes severe, serious and potentially life-threatening infections for these specified organisms only, as they are the major tracers that have been used over time for identifying epidemiological trends.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Systemic infection (disorder)
  • Causes

    Bacterium (organism)|Superkingdom Bacteria (organism)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code P36

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    Infectious disorders of eyelid

    A disease caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis. This disease is characterized by a roughening of the inner surfaces of the eyes, and inflammation that may lead to superficial vascularization of the cornea (pannus) and scarring of the conjunctiva. Long term effects include blindness or other visual impairments. Transmission is by direct or indirect contact with the eyes or nose of an infected individual.

    Additional Information

    A chlamydial conjunctivitis of insidious or abrupt onset; the infection may persist for a few years if untreated, but the characteristic lifetime duration of active disease in hyperendemic areas is the result of frequent reinfection. The disease is characterized by the presence of lymphoid follicles and diffuse conjunctival inflammation (papillary hypertrophy), particularly on the tarsal conjunctiva lining the upper eyelid. The inflammation produces superficial vascularization of the cornea (pannus) and scarring of the conjunctiva, which increases with the severity and duration of the inflammatory disease.

    Organ Affected

    Conjunctival structure (body structure)|Entire conjunctiva (body structure)

    Causes

    Chlamydia trachomatis (organism)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A71

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    Intestinal infections due to Shigella

    A condition caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Shigella boydii. This condition is characterized by diarrhoea, fever, or stomach cramps. Transmission is commonly by the faecal-oral route, possibly by ingestion of contaminated foods or direct contact. Confirmation is by identification of Shigella boydii in a faecal sample.

    Additional Information

    An acute bacterial infection of the lining of the intestines by Shigella boydii which is serogruop group C and has 18 serotypes. S boydii usually cause relatively mild illness in which diarrhoea may be watery or bloody and is responsible for scattered disease foci.

    Organ Affected

    Entire intestine (body structure)

    Causes

    Shigella boydii (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Group C shigellosis
  • Also Known As

  • infection due to group C shigella
  • infection due to shigella boydii
  • bacillary dysentery due to shigella boydii
  • bacillary dysentery due to shigella group C
  • Boyd dysentery
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A03.2

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    Also Known As

  • K. pneumoniae as the cause of diseases classified to other chapters
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B96.1

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    Leptospirosis

    The disease due to Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae is Weil??????s disease, which can result in jaundice, renal failure and haemorrhages. Other types of leptospirosis are generally less severe than Weil??????s disease.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Phylum Spirochaetes (organism)|Order Spirochaetales (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Leptospirosis due to Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae
  • Also Known As

  • Weil disease
  • Fiedler disease
  • Haemorrhagic leptospiral jaundice
  • Icteric leptospirosis
  • Leptospiral epidemic jaundice
  • Leptospirosis icterohaemorrhagica
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A27.0

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A49.3

    ----------------------

    Abbreviated Terms

  • acute melioidosis
  • Melioidosis pneumonia
  • fulminating melioidosis
  • acute pulmonary melioidosis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A24.1

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    Abbreviated Terms

  • Pleuro-pneumonia-like-organism [PPLO]
  • Also Known As

  • M. pneumoniae as the cause of diseases classified to other chapters
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B96.0

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    Necrotising fasciitis

    Polymicrobial is the most common form of necrotising fasciitis (qv) and is caused by a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic organisms. In contrast to streptococcal necrotising fasciitis, it tends to occur in elderly or debilitated individuals with other comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus. It can be life-threatening, particularly if it is not recognized promptly and treated by aggressive surgical debridement and immediate antibiotic therapy.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Progressive bacterial synergistic gangrene
  • Also Known As

  • Necrotising fasciitis type 1
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code M72.6

    ----------------------

    Necrotising periodontal diseases

    Necrotising ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is a condition affecting the gums that is caused by a bacterial infection. It is a form of periodontal (gum) disease. But unlike other forms, it typically develops quickly and causes moderate to severe pain. "Necrotising" means that the condition destroys tissue. "Ulcerative" refers to sores that can appear on the gums.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Inflammation (qualifier value)
  • Inflammation (morphologic abnormality)
  • Organ Affected

    Oral mucous membrane structure (body structure)

    Causes

    Genus Spirochaeta (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Fusospirochaetal gangrene
  • Stomatitis gangrenosa
  • acute gangrenous stomatitis
  • necrotic stomatitis
  • necrotising ulcerative gingivostomatitis
  • necrotising stomatitis
  • Also Known As

  • mouth gangrene
  • necrotising ulcerative stomatitis
  • gangrene stomatitis
  • ulcerosa necroticans stomatitis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A69.0

    ----------------------

    Necrotising ulcerative gingivitis

    This is a sub-classification of necrotising periodontal disease, an infection of the gum tissue, that presents as an acute infection of the gingiva without involvement of the other tissues of the periodontium.

    Where It Occurs

    Digestive System

    Organ Affected

    Gingival structure|Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (disorder)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • acute necrotizing gingivitis
  • acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivostomatitis
  • acute necrotizing pellagrous gingivitis
  • Also Known As

  • ANUG - [Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis]
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A69.0

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    Neonatal pyogenic skin infections

    Neonatal necrotising fasciitis is a life-threatening acute necrotising infection of fascia, subcutaneous tissues, and overlying skin similar to the condition seen in adults. It is rare in neonates but, in contrast to the adult form, tends to affect otherwise healthy babies. It has followed omphalitis, mastitis and postoperative wound infection, though preceding sites of infection are not always found. It has more commonly been associated with Staphylococcus aureus than with streptococcal infection. Gram-negative organisms have also been implicated. It may cause extensive tissue destruction and mortality is high.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code M72.6

    ----------------------

    Nocardiosis

    A disease of the respiratory system, caused by an infection with the gram-positive bacteria Nocardia. This disease is characterized by chest pain, haemoptysis, fever, weight loss, and cough. Transmission is by inhalation of Nocardia from soil or water. Confirmation is by identification of Nocardia in sputum samples, or lung biopsy.

    Additional Information

    This is a pulmonary infectious disease affecting either the lungs (pulmonary nocardiosis) or the whole body (systemic nocardiosis). It is due to infection by bacterium of the genus Nocardia, most commonly Nocardia asteroides or Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • lung nocardiosis
  • nocardial pneumonia
  • nocardiosis pneumonia
  • pneumonia with nocardiasis
  • Also Known As

  • nocardiosis of lung
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A43.0

    ----------------------

    Non-venereal treponematoses

    Endemic non-venereal syphilis is caused by Treponema pallidum subspecies endemicum and is transmitted by skin-to-skin or mouth-to-mouth contact rather than sexual contact. Children are at greatest risk of infection. Clinical features are similar to venereal syphilis with a primary ulcer (usually in the mouth or on the nipples of breast-feeding women nursing infected children) and, in the secondary stage, a generalized papular rash, oral mucous patches, condylomata lata and generalized lymphadenopathy. Late stage infection is characterized by destructive gummata of the nasopharynx (gangosa), bones and skin.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Dichuchwa
  • Siti
  • Skerljevo
  • Also Known As

  • Bejel
  • Endemic syphilis
  • Njovera
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A65

    ----------------------

    Other bacterial diseases

    Any infection caused by the gram-negative bacteria Bartonella.

    Additional Information

    Infections by the genus Bartonella. Bartonella bacilliformis can cause acute febrile anemia, designated Oroya fever, and a benign skin eruption, called verruga peruana. Bartonella quintana causes Trench fever, while Bartonella Henselae is the etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis (Angiomatosis, bacillary) and is also one of the causes of Cat-scratch disease in immunocompetent patients.

    Causes

    Genus Felis (organism)|Subfamily Felinae (organism)|Family Felidae (organism)|Felis silvestris (organism)|Bartonella species (organism)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A44

    ----------------------

    Pinta

    The primary stage of pinta is characterized by a sparse eruption of cutaneous papules and erythematous scaly plaques. This stage may last for months to years.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Organ Affected

    Skin structure (body structure)|Entire skin (body structure)

    Causes

    Treponema carateum (organism)

    Also Known As

  • Primary chancre of pinta
  • Primary chancre of carate
  • Primary papule of carate
  • Primary papule of pinta
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A67.0

    ----------------------

    Polymicrobial necrotising fasciitis

    This is a severe, rapidly extending sub-type of polymicrobial necrotising fasciitis (qv) occurring in elderly men and is caused by a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. It typically starts in the scrotum and then spreads to the perineum and abdominal wall. It may less commonly involve the penis and in the rare cases where the penis is the major site of infection has been termed Corbus disease. It has a high mortality if not treated aggressively.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)|Male Genital System

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Fournier gangrene of the penis
  • Fournier gangrene of the scrotum and perineum
  • Corbus disease
  • Also Known As

  • Fournier gangrene
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code M72.6

    ----------------------

    Pyogenic bacterial infections of the skin or subcutaneous tissues

    Necrotising fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection involving rapidly progressive, widespread destruction and necrosis of subcutaneous tissue and superficial fascia. The commonest causal agent is Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus but frequently the infection may be polymicrobial. Emergency surgical fasciotomy and debridement of necrotic tissue is required to halt progression and reduce the high risk of a fatal outcome.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code M72.6

    ----------------------

    Q fever

    A type of bacterial pneumonia caused by Coxiella burnetii. Infection usually occurs by inhalation of these organisms from air that contains airborne barnyard dust contaminated by dried placental material, birth fluids, and excreta of infected animals such as cattle, sheep, and goats.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Q fever pneumonia
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A78

    ----------------------

    Rat-bite fevers

    A disease caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Spirillum minus. This disease is initially characterized by local inflammation, followed by fever, lymphadenitis, and headache. Transmission is commonly by direct contact through the bite or scratch of an infected rat. Confirmation is by identification of Spirillum in blood or tissue samples.

    Additional Information

    Spirillary rat-bite fever, also known as Sodoku (Japanese for so: rat and doku: poison), is an infectious disease caused by the Gram-negative bacillus Spirillum minus and is transmitted to humans through the bites and scratches of rats, and characterized by local inflammation, fever, lyphoadenopathies and macular rash (50% of cases).

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Bacterium (organism)|Superkingdom Bacteria (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Sodoku
  • Sokosho
  • Spirillary rat-bite fever
  • Also Known As

  • Rat-bite fever due to Spirillum minus
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A25.0

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    Reactive dermatoses due to distant bacterial infection

    Erythema multiforme is a skin condition of unknown cause, possibly mediated by deposition of immune complex (mostly IgM) in the superficial microvasculature of the skin and oral mucous membrane that usually follows an infection or drug exposure. This diagnosis is provoked by a very small bacterium in the class Mollicutes. It causes the disease mycoplasma pneumonia, a form of atypical bacterial pneumonia, and is related to cold agglutinin disease.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B96.0

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    Relapsing fever

    A disease caused by an infection with the bacteria Borrelia. This disease is characterized by repeated episodes of fever, with the febrile episode lasting for approximately 3 days, followed by the afebrile state of approximately 7 days. Transmission is through the bite of an infected body louse. Confirmation is by identification of spirochete bacteria from a blood smear, bone marrow, or cerebrospinal fluid.

    Additional Information

    Louse-borne relapsing fever is due to the transmission from human to human of the spirochaete Borrelia recurrentis by the human body louse. Although it occurs sporadically in endemic areas including Ethiopia and Sudan, it may result in large epidemics in situations where overcrowding and poor sanitation exist, as may occur as a result of war. It is characterized by episodes of high fever accompanied by headache, photophobia, myalgia, abdominal pain and severe systemic upset with jaundice, haemoptysis, hypotension and petechial rash. If it is untreated the mortality rate may reach 70%.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Bite of Anoplura species (event)

    Also Known As

  • Relapsing fever due to Borrelia recurrentis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A68.0

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    Rickettsioses

    A disease caused by an infection with the gram-negative bacteria Rickettsia. This disease is characterized by fever, delirium, back pain, or arthralgia. Transmission is commonly through the bite of an infected flea, louse, mite, or tick.

    Additional Information

    Group of acute, arthropod borne infections caused by rickettsiae; includes epidemic (classic or louse-borne) typhus, its recrudescent form, and murine (endemic or flea-borne) typhus; all are characterized by severe headache, chills, high fever, stupor, and rash.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A75

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    Shigellosis due to Shigella boydii

    This refers to inflammation of the small intestine due to infection of bacteria, Shigella boydii.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Group C shigellosis resulting in enteritis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A03.2

    ----------------------

    Shigellosis due to Shigella dysenteriae

    This refers to inflammation of the small intestine due to infection of bacteria, Shigella dysenteriae.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Enteritis in Shigellosis due to Group A shigellosis
  • Enteritis in Shigellosis due to Shiga-Kruse dysentery
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A03.0

    ----------------------

    Shigellosis due to Shigella flexneri

    This refers to inflammation of the small intestine due to infection of bacteria, Shigella flexneri.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Group B shigellosis resulting in enteritis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A03.1

    ----------------------

    Shigellosis due to Shigella sonnei

    This refers to inflammation of the large intestine due to infection of bacteria, Shigella sonnei.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A03.3

    ----------------------

    Abbreviated Terms

  • brucellosis screening
  • diphtheria screening
  • leprosy screening
  • screening for plague
  • screening for whooping cough
  • tetanus screening
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code Z11.2

    ----------------------

    Also Known As

  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever
  • Sao Paulo fever
  • Sao Paulo typhus
  • Lone star spotted fever
  • Colombian spotted fever
  • American spotted fever
  • Tick typhus due to Rickettsia rickettsii
  • Rocky Mountain tick fever
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A77.0

    ----------------------

    Streptococcus

    Streptococcus is a genus of spherical Gram-positive bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes and the lactic acid bacteria group. Staphylococcus is a genus of Gram-positive bacteria. Under the microscope, they appear round (cocci), and form in grape-like clusters. This diagnosis is, group D, as the cause of diseases classified to other chapters.

    Also Known As

  • Group D Streptococcus
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B95.2

    ----------------------

    Trachoma

    This refers to the initial stage of an infectious disease caused by the Chlamydia trachomatis bacterium which produces a characteristic roughening of the inner surface of the eyelids.

    Organ Affected

    Conjunctival structure (body structure)|Entire conjunctiva (body structure)

    Causes

    Chlamydia trachomatis (organism)

    Also Known As

  • Trachoma dubium
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A71.0

    ----------------------

    Additional Information

    A zoonotic bacterial disease caused by Francisella tularensis. The organism is inoculated following a bite, cut or scrap. An ulcer forms at the site of infection and the infection spreads to the lymph nodes that drain the inoculation site.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A21.0

    ----------------------

    Typhus fever

    This is a form of typhus so named because the disease often causes epidemics following wars and natural disasters. The causative organism is Rickettsia prowazekii, transmitted by the human body louse (Pediculus humanus corporis).

    Causes

    Bite of Anoplura species (event)|Typhus (disorder)

    Also Known As

  • Brill-Zinsser disease
  • Brill disease
  • recrudescent typhus due to rickettsia prowazekii
  • recrudescent typhus fever
  • recrudescent Brill-Zinsser typhus due to rickettsia prowazekii
  • recrudescent Brill disease
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A75.1

    ----------------------

    Yaws

    Primary yaws results from primary inoculation of Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue into the skin, manifesting 2-12 weeks later as a localized papule (initial, primary or ??????mother' yaw) before developing into a large non-tender ulcerating nodule, often resembling a raspberry (hence the name ??????framboesia??????). The primary lesion is most commonly located on the legs and ankles may also be found on the buttocks, arms, hands, and face. It usually heals after 3??????ǣ6 months and is still present at the onset of the secondary stage in only a minority (9-15%).

    Additional Information

    The initial or primary lesion (??????mother yaw??????) appears at the site of inoculation on an exposed part of the body 2??????ǣ12 weeks after inoculation. It usually starts as a localized papule, which may develop into a large nodule 2??????ǣ5 cm in diameter that ulcerates. Ulcers are usually non-tender and have a characteristic granular surface reminiscent of a raspberry (hence the name ??????framboesia??????). Ulcers often exude a yellow discharge that may dry to form a crust. The primary lesion is most commonly found on the legs and ankles (65 to 85% of cases), but may be on the buttocks, arms, hands, and face. It usually heals after 3??????ǣ6 months, regressing into a pitted scar with dark margins, and only in a small proportion of patients (9-15%) does the primary lesion persist at the onset of the secondary stage.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Also Known As

  • Chancre of yaws
  • Primary framboesia
  • initial lesions of yaws
  • mother yaw
  • initial framboesia
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A66.0

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