Sun Exposure

Ultraviolet (UV) rays are an invisible form of radiation. They can pass through your skin and damage your skin cells. Sunburns are a sign of skin damage. Suntans aren't healthy, either. They appear after the sun's rays have already killed some cells and damaged others. UV rays can cause skin damage during any season or at any temperature. They can also cause eye problems, wrinkles, skin spots, and skin cancer.

To protect yourself

  • Stay out of the sun when it is strongest (between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.)
  • Use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher
  • Wear protective clothing
  • Wear wraparound sunglasses that provide 100 percent UV ray protection
  • Avoid sunlamps and tanning beds

Check your skin regularly for changes in the size, shape, color, or feel of birthmarks, moles, and spots. Such changes are a sign of skin cancer.

Food and Drug Administration

Different Conditions

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Actinic keratosis and other discrete epidermal dysplasias

Actinic keratoses (AKs) are focal areas of abnormal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation induced by chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation. They are very common on sun-exposed skin of fair-skinned individuals who have had excessive exposure to sunlight. Initially flat scaly papules, they may become significantly elevated from the skin surface by producing dense adherent keratin or as a result of unregulated cellular proliferation which may progress to frank carcinoma in situ or invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

Where It Occurs

Skin System (Integumentary System)

Organ Affected

Epidermis structure

Causes

Ultraviolet radiation

Also Known As

  • Solar keratosis
  • AK - [actinic keratosis]
  • SK - [solar keratosis]
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L57.0

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    Also Known As

  • Hypertrophic solar keratosis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L57.0

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    Acute effects of ultraviolet radiation on normal skin

    An injury to the skin causing erythema, tenderness, and sometimes blistering and resulting from excessive exposure to the sun. The reaction is produced by the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight.

    Organ Affected

    Skin structure (body structure)|Entire skin (body structure)

    Causes

    Injury due to exposure to external cause (disorder)|Light emitted by the sun (physical force)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L55

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    Acute phototoxic reaction to fragrance

    Phototoxic dermatitis from application of photoactive fragrances to the skin, typically the sides of the neck. It may present with hypermelanosis rather than inflammation.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Inflammation (qualifier value)
  • Inflammation (morphologic abnormality)
  • Organ Affected

    Skin structure (body structure)|Entire skin (body structure)

    Causes

    Injury due to exposure to external cause (disorder)|Light emitted by the sun (physical force)

    Also Known As

  • Berlock dermatitis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L56.2

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    Autoimmune or other photodermatoses

    Solar urticaria is an uncommon form of physical urticaria provoked by skin exposure to visible light and/or ultraviolet radiation.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Organ Affected

    Entire skin (body structure)

    Also Known As

  • Sunlight-induced urticaria
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L56.3

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L57.1

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L57

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L56.9

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code X32

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L57

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    Polymorphic light eruption

    A localized form of polymorphic light eruption. Polymorphic light eruption (PLE) is the most common of the photodermatoses. Juvenile spring eruption is a variant of PLE, affecting only the ears.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L56.4

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    Also Known As

  • Erythema solare
  • Solar erythema
  • first degree sunburn
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L55.0

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