Parasitic Diseases

Parasites are living things that use other living things - like your body - for food and a place to live. You can get them from contaminated food or water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not.

Parasites range in size from tiny, one-celled organisms called protozoa to worms that can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies can lead to Giardia infections. Cats can transmit toxoplasmosis, which is dangerous for pregnant women. Others, like malaria, are common in other parts of the world.

If you are traveling, it's important to drink only water you know is safe. Prevention is especially important. There are no vaccines for parasitic diseases. Some medicines are available to treat parasitic infections.

Different Conditions

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Related ICD 10 COde
ICD 10 Code A06

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Abscess of lung or mediastinum

An abscess of the lung or pleura caused by Entamoeba histolytica; commonly secondary to an amoebic liver abscess that ruptures through the diaphragm into the lung, but may arise via the mesenteric blood vessels or lymphatics.

Organ Affected

Lung structure (body structure)|Entire lung (body structure)

Causes

Entamoeba histolytica

Abbreviated Terms

  • Amoebic abscess of lung
  • Amoebic abscess of lung and liver
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A06.5

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    Acoustic neuritis

    This term is for inflammation of a nerve or the general inflammation of the peripheral nervous system, in infectious diseases classified elsewhere.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Inflammation (qualifier value)
  • Inflammation (morphologic abnormality)
  • Organ Affected

    Vestibulocochlear nerve structure (body structure)

    Causes

    Disease caused by parasite (disorder)|Infectious disease (disorder)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code H94.0

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    African trypanosomiasis

    A disease caused by an infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. This disease is characterized by fever, headache, muscle and joint aches, or malaise. This disease may also present with lymphadenopathy, weight loss, or neurological deficits. Transmission is through the bite of an infected tsetse fly. Confirmation is by identification of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in a biopsy of the lymph node.

    Additional Information

    West African or Gambian African trypanosomiasis, is a disease caused by the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, which is transmitted to human hosts by bites of infected tsetse flies Glossina palpalis. The reservoirs of infection for these vectors are exclusively human in West African trypanosomiasis.

    Causes

    Trypanosomiasis (disorder)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Infection due to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense
  • Also Known As

  • West African sleeping sickness
  • West African trypanosomiasis.
  • mid-African sleeping sickness
  • Gambian trypanosomiasis
  • Gambian sleeping sickness
  • Gambian fever
  • chronic sleeping sickness
  • infection by trypanosoma gambiense
  • trypanosoma brucei gambiense trypanosomiasis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B56.0

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    Amoebic enteritis

    A symptomatic form of amoebiasis (E. histolytica infection) characterized by long-standing infection and severe diarrhea.

    Organ Affected

    Entire intestine (body structure)

    Causes

    Entamoeba histolytica

    Abbreviated Terms

  • chronic amoebic dysentery
  • amoebic; enteritis, chronic
  • bowel; ulcer, amoebic
  • chronic intestinal amoebiasis without mention of abscess
  • intestinal; ulcer, amoebic
  • ulcer; amoebic
  • ulcer; bowel, intestine, amoebic
  • amoebic; diarrhoea, chronic
  • Also Known As

  • chronic intestinal amoebiasis
  • chronic small intestinal amoebiasis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A06.1

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    Amoebic nondysenteric colitis

    This is a rare complication of entamoeba histolytica, where in response to the infecting amoeba there is formation of annular colonic granulation, which results in a large local lesion of the bowel, in the large intestine.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • acute amoebic rectocolitis
  • amoebic proctitis
  • Also Known As

  • amoeba of intestine
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A06

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    Ancylostomiasis

    This is inflammation of the duodenum due to a genus of moths of the Pyralidae family, Ancylostoma hookworms.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B76.0

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    Angiostrongyliasis

    A disease of the intestines caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Angiostrongylus costaricensis. This disease is characterized by abdominal pain, fever, nausea, or vomiting. This disease may also present with intestinal obstruction or perforation. Transmission is by ingestion of infected undercooked slugs, or food contaminated by infected slugs or their slime. Confirmation is by identification of Angiostrongylus costaricensis from a cerebrospinal fluid sample, blood sample or from a food history.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Morera disease
  • Also Known As

  • Abdominal angiostrongylosis
  • Angiostrongyliasis due to Angiostrongylus costaricensis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B81.3

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    Anisakiasis

    Infection with the third-stage larvae of the roundworm Anisakis marina, which burrow into the stomach wall, producing an eosinophilic granulomatous mass with severe stomach pain. Infection is acquired by eating undercooked marine fish.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B81.0

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    Ascariasis

    Infection by nematodes of the genus Ascaris. Ingestion of infective eggs causes diarrhoea and pneumonitis. Its distribution is more prevalent in areas of poor sanitation and where human feces are used for fertilizer. Intestinal complications may include (radiating) abdominal pain, distention, colic, nausea, anorexia or intestinal obstruction.

    Organ Affected

    Entire intestine (body structure)

    Causes

    Strongyloides stercoralis (organism)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B77.0

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    Asymptomatic enteric carriage of Entamoeba

    Entamoeba histolytica can live in the large intestine (colon) without causing damage to the instestines. Other protozoan such as Entamoeba coli, E. hartmanni, E. polecki, Endolimax nana, and Iodamoeba buetschlii are generally considered nonpathogenic and reside in the large intestine of the human host.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A06

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    Capillariasis due to Capillaria philippinensis

    A condition caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Capillaria philippinensis. This condition is characterized by abdominal pain, diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, or weight loss. Transmission is by ingestion of infected undercooked fish, or autoinfection. Confirmation is by identification of Capillaria phillippinensis in a tissue biopsy of the small intestines or faecal sample.

    Also Known As

  • intestinal infection due to Capillaria philippinensis
  • Intestinal capillariasis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B81.1

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    Certain fluke infestations affecting the skin

    Skin involvement in schistosomiasis may occur either as a result of the initial penetration of the skin by water-borne, free-living cercariae (schistosomal dermatitis), during an immune-complex-mediated phase of infection with S japonica (Katayama fever) or in the later stages of infestation as a result of ectopic localization of worms or ova, especially in paraumbilical and paragenital skin.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Paragenital granulomatous schistosomiasis
  • Schistosomal dermatitis
  • Also Known As

  • Cutaneous schistosomiasis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B65

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    Certain nematode infestations affecting the skin

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Ancylostoma. This disease is characterized by pruritus at the site of larval penetration. In mild infections, this disease may be asymptomatic; in moderate to severe infections, this disease may present with cough, pharyngeal irritation during larval migration in airways, iron-deficiency anaemia, abdominal pain, nausea, bloody diarrhoea, fatigue, or delayed development (mental or physical). Transmission is by direct contact with larvae from soil or sand contaminated with dog or cat faeces (by percutaneous migration of larvae), ingestion of larvae, or vertical transmission. Confirmation is by identification of Ancylostoma in a faecal sample.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Hookworm (organism)

    Also Known As

  • Hook-worm infestation by Ancylostoma
  • Ancylostoma infestation
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B76.0

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    Certain protozoal diseases

    Any condition caused by an infection with the protozoan parasite Naegleria.

    Causes

    Naegleria fowleri (organism)

    Also Known As

  • infection by naegleria
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B60.2

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    Contact with health services for purposes of examination or investigation

    A reason for encounter to screen for an infection with a bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic source.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code Z11

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    Abbreviated Terms

  • contact with acariasis
  • exposure to acariasis
  • contact with parasitic disease
  • contact with pediculosis
  • exposure to pediculosis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code Z20.7

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    Cutaneous myiasis

    A form of migratory cutaneous myiasis caused by larvae of certain species of Gasterophilus, the horse bot-fly. It resembles cutaneous larva migrans.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B87.0

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    Cysticercosis

    Cysticercosis is infection with larvae of Taenia solium, the pork tapeworm, which develop from ingestion of the ova excreted with human feces. This will penetrate intestinal wall and disseminate to brain and skeletal muscle. Cysticercosis should be differentiated from taeniasis, which is carriage of the adult tapeworm in the intestine.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B69

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    Cystoisosporiasis

    Isosporiasis is a human small intestinal disease caused by the protozoan Isospora belli.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Infection due to Isopora belli
  • Infection due to Isopora hominis
  • Also Known As

  • coccidial enteritis
  • enteric coccidiosis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A07.3

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    Dirofilariasis

    Infection induced by Dirofilariasis immitis larvae, which lodge in small pulmonary arteries causing thoracic pain (both pleural and nonpleural), purulent or hemoptoic sputum, hemoptysis, dsypnea, malaise and myalgia.

    Additional Information

    Infection induced by Dirofilariasis immitis larvae, which lodge in small pulmonary arteries causing thoracic pain (both pleural and nonpleural), purulent or hemoptoic sputum, hemoptysis, dsypnea, malaise and myalgia. Fever is present in a minority of cases. The larvae, which are carried by infected mosquitos (Aedes, Culex, Anopheles, Mansonia species) can cause infarcts or granulomas, which appear as 1-3 cm nodules or cavities on chest radiography. This appearance is referred to as a ??????coin lesion."
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B74.8

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    Disseminated strongyloidiasis

    This refers to glomerular disorderrs in a human parasitic disease caused by the nematode (roundworm) Strongyloides stercoralis, or sometimes S. f???lleborni.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B78.7

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B67.0

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    Echinococcus infection of bone

    This is a cyclophyllid cestode that parasitizes the small intestine of canids as an adult, but which has important intermediate hosts such as livestock and humans, where it causes hydatid disease. This diagnosis is with infection of the bone.

    Organ Affected

    Entire bone (organ) (body structure)|Entire bony skeleton (body structure)

    Causes

    Echinococcus granulosus (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • echinococcal osteomyelitis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B67.2

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    Echinococcus infection of lung

    This is a cyclophyllid cestode that parasitizes the small intestine of canids as an adult, but which has important intermediate hosts such as livestock and humans, where it causes hydatid disease. This diagnosis is with infection of the lung.

    Organ Affected

    Lung structure (body structure)|Entire lung (body structure)

    Causes

    Echinococcus granulosus (organism)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B67.1

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    Endophthalmitis

    This refers to an inflammation of the internal coats of the eye. This diagnosis is in a disease of humans caused by the parasitic roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B77.8

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B80

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    Extraintestinal infections due to Entamoeba

    Penile amoebiasis can present as a purulent balanoposthitis or as an ulcer of the prepuce or glans, when it may simulate a squamous carcinoma. It generally follows penetrative anal intercourse with an individual with intestinal amoebiasis.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Amoebic ulcer of penis
  • Amoebic balanitis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A06

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    Filariasis due to Brugia species

    This is a parasitic disease (usually an infectious tropical disease) that is caused by thread-like nematodes (roundworms) belonging to the superfamily Filarioidea, also known as "filariae". This diagnosis is due to a human filarial parasitic nematode (roundworm) which causes the disease "Timor filariasis."

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Mosquito bite (disorder)|Nematode (organism)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B74.2

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    Gambiense trypanosomiasis

    This is an acute inflammation of the brain, in several diseases in vertebrates caused by parasitic protozoan trypanosomes of the genus Trypanosoma.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B56.0

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    Gastroenteritis and colitis of infectious origin

    Any condition of the intestines, caused by an infection with a protozoal parasitic source.

    Additional Information

    Although all infectious agents in humans are parasites, by convention, parasitic diseases are defined as those caused by protozoa or helminths. The pathophysiology of the diseases caused by these organisms is determined by their life cycle. Mechanisms of diarrhoea production by intestinal protozoa are related to direct cytotoxic effects, the ability to invade, and/or effects of the immune response on the intestinal epithelium. No evidence suggests that intestinal protozoa produce enterotoxins.

    Organ Affected

    Entire intestine (body structure)

    Causes

    Protozoan parasite (organism)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A07

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    Helminthiases

    An infestation caused by helminths of the genus Schistosoma. The clinical features vary according to the species involved but the principal organs affected are the gastrointestinal tract and bladder.

    Additional Information

    A blood fluke (trematode) infection with adult male and female worms living within mesenteric or vesical veins of the host over a life span of many years. Eggs produce minute granulomata and scars in organs where they lodge or are deposited.

    Causes

    Schistosoma (organism)|Blood trematode (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • snail fever
  • acute schistosomiasis
  • schistosomal pneumonitis
  • Also Known As

  • Bilharziasis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B65

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B71.0

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    Infections due to Ancylostoma

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic hookworm Ancylostoma duodenale. This disease is characterized by pruritus at the site of larval penetration. In mild infections, this disease may be asymptomatic; in moderate to severe infections, this disease may present with cough, pharyngeal irritation during larval migration in airways, iron-deficiency anaemia, abdominal pain, nausea, bloody diarrhoea, fatigue, or delayed development (mental or physical). Transmission is by direct contact with larvae from soil or sand contaminated with dog or cat faeces (by percutaneous migration of larvae), ingestion of larvae, or vertical transmission. Confirmation is by identification of Ancylostoma duodenale in a faecal sample.

    Also Known As

  • Ancylostomiasis due to Ancylostoma duodenale
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B76.0

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    Abbreviated Terms

  • angiostrongyliasis; a. cantonensis
  • infection by angiostrongylus cantonensis
  • infestation; angiostrongylus, cantonensis
  • Also Known As

  • Angiostrongyliasis due to Parastrongylus cantonensis
  • Infection due to Parastrongylus cantonensis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B83.2

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    Infections due to Anisakis

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Anisakis. This disease presents with severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, or a hypersensitivity reaction. Transmission is by ingestion of undercooked contaminated fish or squid. Confirmation is by a history of consumption of undercooked fish or squid, or identification of Anisakis in the intestines or in a vomit sample.

    Additional Information

    Anisakiasis is a cosmopolitan parasitosis caused by the larvae of nematodes (roundworms) that infect marine mammals. Contamination is due to the ingestion of raw, undercooked, smoked, or home-marinated fish. The disease mainly occurs in Japan and in Northern Europe. Digestive pain and hypereosinophilia direct the diagnosis, which is confirmed by endoscopic, histological, and/or serologic methods. Preventive measures include cooking fish sufficiently or freezing it for at least 24 hrs at -20???C.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Infection due to Anisakis larvae
  • Also Known As

  • anisakiasis due to Anisakis simplex
  • anisakiasis due to Pseudoterranova decipiens
  • anisakis infestation
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B81.0

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    Infections due to Ascaris

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Ascaris lumbricoides. This disease presents with symptoms depending on the extent of the infection, ranging from asymptomatic to intestinal blockage. Transmission is by the faecal-oral route from the ingestion of Ascaris eggs in contaminated food or water. Confirmation is by identification of Ascaris eggs in a faecal sample.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • ascaridiasis
  • roundworm infection
  • Also Known As

  • Infection due to Ascaris lumbricoides
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B77

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    Infections due to Babesia

    A disease caused by the protozoan parasite Babesia. This disease is characterized by reproduction and lysis of erythrocytes leading to symptoms that depend on the level of parasitemia and immune status of the infected individual. This disease may present with fever, chills, malaise, myalgia, haemolytic anemia, shock, or may be asymptomatic. Transmission is through the bite of an infected tick (Ixodes), or vertical transmission. Confirmation is by identification of Babesia in a blood smear, or detection of antibodies against Babesia.

    Additional Information

    Babesiosis is a tick-borne malaria-like zoonotic infection caused by intraerythrocytic protozoan parasites of the Babesia genus. Humans are opportunistic hosts for Babesia when bitten by nymph or adult ticks. The clinical signs and symptoms of babesiosis are related to the parasitism of RBCs by Babesia. Fever, hemolytic anemia, and hemoglobinuria may result from Babesia infection. As with malaria, RBC fragments may cause capillary blockage and/or microvascular stasis, explaining liver, splenic, renal, and CNS involvement. As with malaria, cells of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) in the spleen remove damaged RBC fragments from the circulation. RBC destruction results in hemolytic anemia.. Babesiosis may also be transmitted via blood transfusion.

    Causes

    Babesia (organism)

    Also Known As

  • Piroplasmosis
  • babesiasis
  • infection by babesia
  • piroplasma infection
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B60.0

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    Infections due to Balantidium coli

    This is an inflammatory disorder of the intestine, especially of the colon, that results in severe diarrhea containing mucus and/or blood in the feces with fever, abdominal pain, and rectal tenesmus (a feeling of incomplete defecation), caused by any kind of infection. This diagnosis is due to a parasitic species of ciliate protozoan that causes the disease Balantidiasis.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • ciliary dysentery
  • ciliate dysentery
  • Balantidial dysentery
  • Also Known As

  • balantidium coli dysentery
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A07.0

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    Infections due to Dicrocoelium

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Dicrocoelium dendriticum. This disease is commonly asymptomatic. This disease may present with cholecystitis, liver abscesses, or upper abdominal pain. Transmission is by ingestion of infected ants. Confirmation is by identification of Dicrocoelium dendriticum eggs in a faecal sample or duodenal fluid.

    Causes

    Class Trematoda (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Infection due to Dicrocoelium dendriticum
  • dicrocoelium dendriticum
  • dicrocoelium dendriticum infestation
  • lancet fluke infestation
  • Also Known As

  • Lancet fluke infection
  • dicroceliosis
  • lancet fluke disease
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B66.2

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    Infections due to Diphyllobothrium

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Diphyllobothrium. This disease is characterized by abdominal discomfort, diarrhoea, vomiting, or weight loss. This disease may be asymptomatic. Transmission is by ingestion of infected undercooked fish. Confirmation is by identification of Diphyllobothriasis eggs in a faecal sample.

    Causes

    Diphyllobothrium (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • adult diphyllobothrium infection
  • adult diphyllobothrium latum infection
  • adult diphyllobothrium pacificum infection
  • dibothriocephalus latus
  • infection by diphyllobothrium latum
  • infection by diphyllobothrium pacificum
  • bothriocephalus infestation
  • Also Known As

  • tapeworm anaemia.
  • fish tapeworm infection
  • Dibothriocephalus anaemia
  • dibothriocephaliasis
  • broad tapeworm infection
  • bothriocephalosis
  • bothriocephaliasis
  • dibothriocephalus
  • diphyllobothrium infection
  • fish tapeworm
  • intestinal diphyllobothriasis
  • diphyllobothrium infestation
  • dibothriocephalus infestation
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B70

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    Infections due to Dipylidium

    A condition caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Dipylidium caninum. This condition commonly present with abdominal pain, diarrhoea, anal pruritus, or may be asymptomatic. Transmission is by ingestion of an infected flea. Confirmation is by identification of Dipylidium caninum eggs in a faecal sample.

    Causes

    Cestode (organism)|Class Cestoda (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • infestation by dipylidium caninum
  • Also Known As

  • dog fleaworm infection.
  • dipylidiosis
  • dipylidium infection
  • dog fleaworm
  • infection by dipylidium caninum
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B71.1

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    Infections due to Dirofilaria

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Dirofilaria. This disease presents with symptoms which depend on the site of infection. In the lungs, this disease may present with chest pain, cough, fever, chill, or haemoptysis. In the skin, this disease may present with subcutaneous nodules that are tender or painful. Other body sites may also be affected. Transmission is through the bite of an infected mosquito. Confirmation is commonly by histopathology of affected tissue.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Mosquito bite (disorder)|Nematode (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • infection by dirofilaria
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B74.8

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    Infections due to Dracunculus

    A disease resulting from drinking water contaminated with water fleas infected with larvae of the nematode Dracunculus medinensis. It may take up to a year from ingestion of larvae for a mature gravid female worm to migrate to the skin and discharge immature larvae on contact with water. Dracunculiasis typically manifests as an intensely pruritic papule on a lower extremity from which part of the worm may emerge. Secondary pyogenic infection is common. This may be preceded by generalized symptoms such as fever, pruritus, urticaria and oedema.

    Additional Information

    Following ingestion, D. medinensis larvae enter and mature within the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space after penetrating the host stomach and intestinal wall. Patient remains asymptomatic for a year long incubation period after which the adult female worm, which can grow up to 1m long, begins to move through the host subcutaneous tissue causing intense pain eventually emerging from the skin often resulting in a secondary bacterial infection, oedema, blistering and ulceration of the exit wound. The emergence of the worm is heralded by a painful papule typically found on the distal lower extremity and can be accompanied by nausea, vomiting and fever. Emergence of the worm from the trunk, genitalia or buttock is less common. Female worms release larvae upon contacting water while emerging from the host. No cure or treatment is available, individuals infected with D. medinensis do not develop immunity to later infection. Infection can be prevented by treating contaminated water sources with larvicide temephos (Abate Larvicide), preventing transmission from each worm through regular bandaging and cleaning and avoidance of entering sources of drinking water when the worm is emerging.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Dracunculus medinensis (organism)

    Also Known As

  • Guinea worm infestation
  • Medina worm infestation
  • Dracunculus medinensis infestation
  • dracontiasis
  • Dracunculosis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B72

    ----------------------

    Additional Information

    The larval stages (hydatid cyst or solid/multivesiculated lesions) of Echinococcus spp. produce disease in humans and animals; disease characteristics depend upon the infecting species.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • echinococcus infection of orbit
  • echinococcus granulosus infestation
  • Also Known As

  • Hydatidosis
  • unilocular echinococcosis
  • Echinococcus disease
  • echinococcus granulosus infection
  • echinococcus multilocularis infection
  • Dog tapeworm infection
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B67

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Entamoeba

    A disease of the colon, caused by an infection with the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. This disease commonly presents with diarrhoea, abdominal pain, or abdominal cramping. Transmission is through the faecal-oral route or ingestion of contaminated food or water. Confirmation is by identification of Entamoeba histolytica in a faecal or blood sample.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A06

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Fasciola

    A disease of the hepatic system, caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Fasciola. In the acute phase, this disease is characterized by upper abdominal pain, fever, urticaria, shortness of breath, nausea, or vomiting due to migration of the parasite from the intestines to the liver. In the chronic phase, this disease is characterized by cholestasis, cholangitis, pancreatitis, or gallstones. This disease may be asymptomatic. Transmission is by ingestion of undercooked contaminated aquatic plants or contaminated water. Confirmation is commonly by identification of Fasciola eggs in a faecal sample (after the individual has followed a liver-free diet prior to testing), or detection of antibodies against Fasciola.

    Causes

    Class Trematoda (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Sheep liver fluke disease
  • infection by fasciola gigantica
  • infection by fasciola hepatica
  • liver fluke infection
  • sheep liver fluke infection
  • Infection due to fasciola indica
  • liver fluke disease
  • liver fluke infestation
  • liver flukes NOS
  • Also Known As

  • infection by fasciola
  • infestation by distoma hepaticum
  • fasciola infestation
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B66.3

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Fasciolopsis

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Fasciolopsis buski. This disease is characterized by abdominal pain or diarrhoea, or may be asymptomatic. This disease may also present with oedema of the face, abdomen, or legs, vomiting, anorexia, or intestinal obstruction. Transmission is by ingestion of undercooked contaminated aquatic plants. Confirmation is by identification of Fasciolopsis buski eggs in a faecal sample.

    Causes

    Class Trematoda (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • intestinal fluke infection
  • Also Known As

  • intestinal distomatosis
  • intestinal distoma
  • giant intestinal fluke infection
  • fasciolopsis buski infection
  • infection by fasciolopsis
  • Busk fluke infection
  • intestinal fluke infestation
  • infestation by fasciolopsis
  • intestinal distomiasis
  • intestinal fluke disease
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B66.5

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Hymenolepis

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Hymenolepis. This disease is commonly asymptomatic. This disease may present with nausea, weakness, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, or vomiting. Transmission is by the ingestion of eggs commonly in contaminated food or water, or ingestion of infected arthropods. Confirmation is by identification of Hymenolepis eggs in a faecal sample.

    Additional Information

    Hymenolepiasis is a cosmopolitan parasitosis caused by the dwarf tapeworm Hymenolepis. The prevalence is unknown but the disease occurs mainly in warm regions. Infection occurs through ingestion of uncooked food contaminated with faeces (containing the parasite eggs) from an affected individual or through accidental consummation of insects that have ingested Hymenolepis eggs, in which the parasite develops up until the larval stage. The vast majority of infections produce no symptoms. Among children with clinical infection, symptoms (in order of decreasing frequency) include restlessness, irritability, diarrhea, abdominal pain, restless sleep, anal pruritus, and nasal pruritus. Rare symptoms include anorexia, increased appetite, vomiting, nausea, bloody diarrhea, hives, extremity pain, headache, dizziness, behavioral disturbances, and seizures.Traditional tapeworm treatments (niclosamide and praziquantel) are effective against this parasitosis. Prophylactic treatment revolves around improving hand hygiene and preventing faecal contamination.

    Causes

    Cestode (organism)|Class Cestoda (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • dwarf tapeworm
  • hymenolepiasis nana
  • hymenolepis diminuta
  • hymenolepis diminuta infection
  • hymenolepis nana infection
  • rat tapeworm
  • Dwarf tapeworm infection
  • Rat tapeworm infection
  • hymenolepis infestation
  • Also Known As

  • hymenolepidosis.
  • hymenolepiosis
  • hymenolepis infection
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B71.0

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Loa loa

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Loa loa. This disease is characterized by Calabar swellings found anywhere on the body (commonly found near joints). This disease may also present with generalized itching, muscle pain, joint pain, fatigue or may be asymptomatic. Transmission is through the bite of an infected fly (genus Chrysops). Confirmation is by identification of adult Loa loa in the skin or eye, Loa loa microfilariae in a blood sample obtained in the day (1000 - 1400), or detection of antibodies against Loa loa in a blood sample.

    Additional Information

    Loiasis is a filariasis caused by nematodes of the genus Loa loa occurring exclusively in the rainforests of Central Africa with a prevalence in hyperendemic regions of between 3 and 30% of the general population. It is transmitted via horseflies of the genus Chrysops. Symptoms may appear 1 to over 15 years after infection, and include localised transient swellings (Calabar swellings), and adult worm migration under the skin or conjunctiva of the eye. Severe complications have also been reported: endocarditis, glomerulonephritis, and encephalitis, although the latter is mainly linked to improper treatment. Diethylcarbamazine is the classical treatment, but ivermectine-based treatments have not yet been clearly assessed.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Mosquito bite (disorder)|Nematode (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Calabar swelling
  • African eyeworm disease
  • Also Known As

  • Eye worm disease of Africa
  • Loa loa infestation
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B74.3

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Mammomonogamus

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Mammomonogamus. This disease is characterized by chronic nonproductive cough, crawling sensation in the throat, wheezing, or difficulties breathing. Transmission may be by ingestion of adult worms or eggs in contaminated food or water. Confirmation is by identification of adult Mammomonogamus by direct visualization, or identification of Mammomonogamus eggs in sputum or faecal samples.

    Causes

    Helminth (organism)

    Also Known As

  • Syngamiasis
  • Mammomonogamiasis
  • Mammomonogamosis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B83.3

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Mansonella

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Mansonella. This disease is characterized by pruritus, dermal pigmentary changes, fever, or lymphadenopathy, or may be asymptomatic. Transmission is through the bite of an infected midge (genus Culicoides) or blackfly (genus Simulium). Confirmation is by identification of Mansonella microfilariae in a skin or blood sample.

    Additional Information

    Mansonellosis are tropical filarioses caused by several species of the Mansonella genus that are spread by small insects of the genus CulicoIdes. Traditionally considered as non-pathogenic, they are now known to cause hypereosinophilia. Clinical manifestations include pruritus and edema in the lower limbs, but each case should be considered individually.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Mosquito bite (disorder)|Nematode (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • acanthocheilonema
  • acanthocheilonemiasis
  • dipetalonema
  • dipetalonemiasis
  • dipetalonemosis
  • infection by dipetalonema
  • acanthocheilonema infestation
  • mansonella ozzardi filariasis
  • mansonella infestation
  • Also Known As

  • Mansonellosis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B74.4

    ----------------------

    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B60.2

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Naegleria

    Any condition caused by an infection with the protozoan parasite Naegleria fowleri.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B60.2

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Necator

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Necator americanus. This disease is characterized by pruritus at the site of larval penetration. In mild infections, this disease may be asymptomatic; in moderate to severe infections, this disease may present with cough, pharyngeal irritation during larval migration in airways, iron-deficiency anaemia, abdominal pain, nausea, arthralgia, or delayed development (mental or physical). Transmission is by direct contact with larvae from soil or sand contaminated with dog or cat faeces (by percutaneous migration of larvae). Confirmation is by identification of Necator americanus in a faecal sample.

    Causes

    Hookworm (organism)|Trichinella (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Infection due to Necator americanus
  • Also Known As

  • miner's anaemia
  • negro cachexia
  • dochmiasis
  • ground itch disease
  • brickmaker's chlorosis
  • coolie itch anaemia
  • cachexia aquosa
  • dew itch anaemia
  • brickmaker's anaemia
  • tunnel worker's anaemia
  • Egyptian anaemia
  • tunnel worker's disease
  • miner's cachexia
  • St Gothard disease
  • Greisinger disease
  • Gothard tunnel disease
  • tropical chlorosis
  • Egyptian chlorosis
  • tunnel anaemia
  • dochmiosis
  • necatorosis
  • African cachexia
  • water itch anaemia
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B76.1

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Onchocerca

    Any condition caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Onchocerca volvulus. These conditions are characterised by the presence of firm subcutaneous nodules filled with adult worms, pruritus, long-term corneal inflammation (keratitis), or thickening of the corneal stroma. If untreated, these infections will lead to blindness. Transmission is through the bite of an infected Simulium fly.

    Additional Information

    Disease transmitted through the bites of infected blackflies of Simulium species, which carry immature larvae of the filarial worm Onchocerca volvulus. The larvae form nodules in host subcutaneous tissue, where they mature to adult worms. After mating, the female adult worm can release up to 1000 microfilariae a day, which cause a variety of conditions, including blindness, skin rashes, lesions, intense itching and skin depigmentation.

    Causes

    Infection by Onchocerca volvulus (disorder)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • craw-craw
  • Also Known As

  • Robles disease
  • Onchocercosis
  • Blinding filariasis
  • infection by onchocerca volvulus
  • robles
  • onchocerca infestation
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B73

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Opisthorchis

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Opisthorchis. This disease is commonly asymptomatic. In mild cases, this disease may present with dyspepsia, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, or constipation; in severe cases, this disease may present with hepatomegaly and malnutrition; in rare cases, this disease may present with cholangitis, cholecystitis, and chlolangiocarcinoma. Transmission is by ingestion of infected undercooked freshwater fish. Confirmation is by identification Opisthorchis in a faecal sample.

    Causes

    Class Trematoda (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • infection by opisthorchis viverrini
  • cat liver fluke infestation
  • Also Known As

  • infection by cat liver fluke
  • infection by opisthorchis
  • opisthorchiosis
  • cat liver fluke fever
  • cat liver fluke disease
  • opisthorchis infestation
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B66.0

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Paragonimus

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Paragonimus. This disease is characterized by cough or haemoptysis, or may be asymptomatic. This disease may present with other symptoms depending on the site where the parasite migrates to. Transmission is commonly by ingestion of undercooked contaminated crustaceans (crab or crayfish). Confirmation is commonly by identification of Paragonimus eggs in a sputum or faecal sample.

    Additional Information

    A disease caused by Paragonimus spp. (most frequently P. westermani). The larvae invade various organs of the body, especially the lungs, where a granulomatous reaction with development of fibrotic encapsulation occurs. Characterized by cough, haemoptysis, chest pain, low-grade fever, and breathlessness with the possible development of bronchiectasis and lung abscesses. The larvae do not grow fully in the human body but migrate, especially in the chest region, and often cause spontaneous pneumothorax as a result of penetration through the visceral pleura. Some species localize preferentially in subcutaneous nodules or in the central nervous system, in which case there are no pulmonary findings.

    Causes

    Class Trematoda (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • infection due to paragonimus species
  • Infestation due to Paragonimus species
  • endemic oriental hemoptysis
  • Oriental lung fluke infestation
  • Also Known As

  • lung fluke disease
  • Pulmonary distomiasis
  • Parasitic haemoptysis
  • Oriental lung fluke disease
  • Endemic haemoptysis
  • infection by paragonimus
  • lung fluke infection
  • paragonimosis
  • paragonimus westermani infection
  • pulmonary distomatosis
  • pulmonary paragonimiasis
  • lung fluke disorder
  • infestation by paragonimus
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B66.4

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Protozoa

    Any condition caused by an infection with the protozoan parasite Balantidium.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • balantidosis
  • Also Known As

  • disease due to balantidiidae
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A07.0

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Schistosoma

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Schistosoma. This disease is characterized by tingling, burning, itching of the skin, small reddish pimples, or small blisters. Transmission is by direct contact with contaminated water. Confirmation is by identification of Schistosoma eggs in a faecal, urine, or blood sample.

    Additional Information

    Cercarial dermatitis is caused by the cercariae of certain species of schistosomes whose normal hosts are birds and mammals other than humans. They attempt to, and, sometimes may actually, enter human skin. The penetration causes a dermatitis which is usually accompanied with intense itching, but the cercariae do not mature into adults in the human body. Implicated schistosome species include Austrobilharzia variglandis (normal host ducks) and Nassarius obsoletus (normal host snails). Cercarial dermatitis (swimmer??????s itch) occurs on the exposed skin outside of close-fitting garments [CDC].

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Inflammation (qualifier value)
  • Inflammation (morphologic abnormality)
  • Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Organ Affected

    Skin structure (body structure)|Entire skin (body structure)

    Causes

    Schistosoma (organism)|Blood trematode (organism)

    Also Known As

  • Clam-digger's itch
  • Rice-paddy itch
  • Sea bather's itch
  • Sawah itch (Bahasa, Malaysia)
  • Schistosomal cercarial dermatitis
  • Swimmer's itch
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B65.3

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Spirometra

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Spirometra. This disease presents with symptoms depending on the site of the infection. Transmission is by ingestion of contaminated water or ingestion of infected undercooked second intermediate hosts (such as fish, reptiles or amphibians). Confirmation is by identification of Spirometra eggs in a faecal sample.

    Causes

    Diphyllobothrium (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Infection due to Sparganum
  • Infection due to Sparganum mansoni
  • Infection due to Sparganum proliferum
  • larval bothriocephalus infestation
  • larval fish tapeworm infection
  • sparganum infestation
  • spirometra larvae infestation
  • Also Known As

  • Larval diphyllobothriasis
  • Spirometrosis
  • infection by diphyllobothrium larvae
  • infection by sparganum
  • infection by spirometra larvae
  • larval dibothriocephaliasis
  • sparganosis - larval diphyllobothriasis
  • spirometriosis
  • larval dibothriocephalus infestation
  • larval diphyllobothrium infestation
  • larval dibothriocephalus
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B70.1

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Strongyloides

    A disease caused by the parasitic worm Strongyloides. This disease presents with symptoms depending on the site of infection (gastrointestinal tract, pulmonary system, dermis, or systemic), or may be asymptomatic. Transmission is by direct contact through penetration of the skin (generally the feet) with larvae from faecally contaminated soil, or autoinfection of an established infection. Confirmation is by identification of Strongyloides larvae in faecal samples, duodenal fluid samples, sputum, pleural fluid, or tissue samples.

    Causes

    Strongyloides stercoralis
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B78

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Taenia

    A disease of the intestines, caused by an infection with the adult parasitic worm Taenia. This disease is characterized by abdominal pain, weight loss, diarrhoea, constipation, or may be asymptomatic. Transmission is by ingestion of larval cysts in undercooked beef or pork. Confirmation is by identification of Taenia eggs or proglottids in faecal samples (samples from multiple days).

    Additional Information

    Infection with tapeworms of the genus Taenia. Taeniasis is a form of tapeworm infection. The worm remains in the intestine until it reaches a length of a meter or so. The two most important human pathogens in the genus are Taenia solium (the pork tapeworm) and Taenia saginata (the beef tapeworm). Infection is acquired by eating undercooked contaminated meat and infected pork. The adult worms live in the lumen of the intestine where it causes very few symptoms. Taeniasis is generally asymptomatic and is diagnosed when a portion of the worm is passed in the stool.

    Causes

    Taenia (organism)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B68

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Toxocara

    A condition caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Toxocara. In ocular infections, this condition is characterized by vision loss or inflammation of the eye; in visceral infections, this condition is characterized by fever, coughing, enlarged liver, or pneumonia. This condition may also be asymptomatic. Transmission is by the faecal-oral route through the ingestion of food, water, or soil that contains Toxocara eggs (contaminated by faeces from an infected dog or cat). Confirmation is by detection of antibodies against Toxocara in a blood sample.

    Organ Affected

    Entire abdominal viscus (body structure)

    Causes

    Helminth (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Toxocara infestation
  • toxocara infection
  • Also Known As

  • Visceral larva migrans
  • Larva migrans visceralis
  • toxocaral visceral larva migrans
  • visceral larva migrans syndrome
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B83.0

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Trichinella

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Trichinella. This disease is characterized by fever, nausea, diarrhoea, vomiting, fatigue, or abdominal discomfort. This disease may also present with headache, chills, cough, swelling of the face and eyes, or aching joints and muscle pains. Transmission is by ingestion of contaminated meat. Confirmation is by detection of antibodies against Trichinella in a blood sample.

    Additional Information

    Trichinosis is a cosmopolitan parasitosis caused by a nematode worm, Trichinella, characterized by an initial phase with fever, diarrhea, and abdominal pain, facial edema and myalgia appear but heal spontaneously after a few weeks. Clinical picture varies from asymptomatic forms to massive invasions that become life-threatening..

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Hookworm (organism)|Trichinella (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Trichinosis encephalitis
  • Trichinosis myositis
  • Also Known As

  • Trichinelliasis
  • Trichiniasis
  • Trichinella spiralis infestation
  • Trichinellosis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B75

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Trichuris

    A disease of the small intestine, caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Trichuris trichiura. This disease is commonly asymptomatic. This disease may also present with painful diarrhoea (containing a mixture of mucus, water, or blood). Transmission is by the faecal-oral route. Confirmation is by identification of Trichuris trichiura eggs in a faecal sample.

    Causes

    Trichuris trichiura (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • whipworm infestation
  • trichuris infestation
  • trichocephalus infestation
  • Also Known As

  • Trichocephaliasis
  • whipworm infection.
  • whipworm disease
  • trichocephalosis
  • infection by trichocephalus trichiura
  • infection by trichuris
  • infection by trichuris trichiuria
  • trichuriosis
  • whipworm
  • Infection due to Trichuris trichiura
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B79

    ----------------------

    Infections due to Trypanosoma

    A disease caused by an infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. This disease presents with symptoms depending on the form of the protozoan parasite (Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense or Trypanosoma brucei gambiense). Transmission is through the bite of an infected tsetse fly. Confirmation is by identification of Trypanosoma brucei in a blood or tissue sample.

    Additional Information

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also called sleeping sickness, is an illness endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, which exists in 2 morphologically identical subspecies: Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (East African or Rhodesian African trypanosomiasis) and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (West African or Gambian African trypanosomiasis). The protozoal is transmitted to human hosts by bites of infected tsetse flies. African trypanosomiasis is distinct from American trypanosomiasis, which is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and has different vectors, clinical manifestations, and therapies.

    Causes

    Trypanosomiasis (disorder)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B56

    ----------------------

    Infections of the fetus or newborn

    Any condition affecting fetuses or newborns, caused by an infection with a parasite.

    Causes

    Parasite (organism)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code P37

    ----------------------

    Infestation by Diptera

    A disease of the tissues, caused by an infection with fly larvae from the order Diptera. This disease is characterized by a lump developing in the tissue. Transmission is by ingestion of contaminated larvae, direct contact with an infected mosquito, tick, fly, or indirect contact with infected fly eggs. Confirmation is by identification of Diptera from a tissue sample.

    Causes

    Maggot (organism)|Infestation by fly larvae (disorder)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • infestation by larvae of flies
  • Also Known As

  • Infestation by fly larvae
  • Maggot infestation
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B87

    ----------------------

    Infestation by Hirudo

    A general term for a disease caused by leeches, Limnatis spp. (especially L. nilotica) and Dinobdella ferox, in which leeches enter and attach themselves to the mucous membrane of the upper respiratory tract, digestive passage, or genitourinary tract. There may be haemoptysis, haematemesis, severe anaemia, and occasionally death from excessive loss of blood.

    Where It Occurs

    Digestive System|Genitourinary System|Respiratory System

    Causes

    Helminth (organism)

    Also Known As

  • internal hirudinea infestation
  • internal infestation of leeches
  • internal leeches
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B83.4

    ----------------------

    Infestation by Pediculus

    A condition of the skin, hair, or genital region caused by an infection with the parasite Pediculus. This disease is characterized by pruritus. This condition also presents with symptoms depending on the site of infection. Transmission is by direct or indirect contact with an infected individual or animal. Confirmation is by identification of Pediculus.

    Additional Information

    Lice infestations are infections of the skin, hair, or genital region caused by lice living directly on the body or in hats or other garments. Lice are generally spread through direct contact with an infested person. There are three types; head lice, body lice, pubic lice.The most common symptom of infestation is pruritus (itching) on the head which normally intensifies 3 to 4 weeks after the initial infestation.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Organ Affected

    Eyelid structure (body structure)|Entire eyelid (body structure)

    Causes

    Infestation by Anoplura (disorder)|Phthirus pubis (organism)|Pediculus humanus (organism)

    Also Known As

  • Louse infestation
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B85.4

    ----------------------

    Infestation by Phthirus

    A condition commonly of the genital area, caused by an infection with the parasite Pthirus pubis. This condition is characterized by pruritus which may lead to sores or thickened discoloured skin. Transmission is by direct or indirect contact with an infected individual or animal, or by sexual contact. Confirmation is by identification of Pthirus pubis eggs or Pthirus pubis.

    Additional Information

    Infestation by the crab louse, Pthirus pubis. Crab lice usually infest pubic hairs but may less commonly infest hair in other body locations including the eyelashes.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Pruritus
  • Itching
  • Excoriation
  • Lymphadenitis
  • Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Infestation by Anoplura (disorder)|Phthirus pubis (organism)

    Also Known As

  • Infestation by crab lice
  • Infestation by Phthirus pubis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B85.4

    ----------------------

    Infestation by Tunga

    A disease of the skin, caused by an infection with the parasite Tunga penetrans. This disease is characterized by lesions (white patch with a black dot in the middle), skin inflammation, or pruritus surrounding the lesion. This disease may also be asymptomatic. Transmission is through the bite of an infected flea, or by direct contact with an infected animal. Confirmation is by identification of Tunga penetrans or travel history.

    Additional Information

    Tungiasis is a parasitic skin disease caused by the female sand flea Tunga penetrans, which burrows into the skin, usually on the feet. The ectoparasitosis is associated with poverty and occurs in many resource-poor communities in the Caribbean, South America and Africa. The lesions are initially itchy and later become painful. Although tungiasis is a self-limited infection, superinfected lesions lead to formation of pustules, suppuration and ulcers. The diagnosis is made clinically, taking into consideration the dynamic nature of the morphology of the lesion. Severe complications occur in heavily infested individuals such as loss of toenails, deformation and auto-amputation of digits. In non-vaccinated individuals the infestation may lead to tetanus. Surgical extraction of the flea under sterile conditions and treatment of secondary infection is the only appropriate treatment currently available.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Tunga penetrans (organism)

    Also Known As

  • Sand-flea infestation
  • Jiggers infestation
  • Tunga penetrans infestation
  • Chigoe infestation
  • Jigger disease
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B88.1

    ----------------------

    Intestinal infections due to Entamoeba

    Amoebic granulomata (amoeboma) may occur in the wall of the large intestine in patients with intermittent dysentery or colitis of long duration.

    Organ Affected

    Entire intestine (body structure)

    Causes

    Entamoeba histolytica

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Amoeboma, NOS
  • amoebic granuloma
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A06.3

    ----------------------

    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B74.3

    ----------------------

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Infection due to Mansonella streptocerca
  • infection by acanthocheilonema streptocerca
  • Streptocerciasis
  • infection by dipetalonema streptocerca
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B74.4

    ----------------------

    Myiasis

    The infestation of the skin or subcutaneous tissues by the larvae of certain flies (Phormia regina, Cordylobia anthropophaga, Cochliomyia hominivorax, C. macellaria, Wohlfahrtia vigil, W. meigeni, W. opaca, Dermatobia hominis, Sarcophaga krameri). Characterized by a painful boil-like lesion containing one or more larvae with severe pruritus and local destruction of tissue.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Also Known As

  • Maggot infestation of the skin
  • Dermal myiasis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B87.0

    ----------------------

    Ocular myiasis

    This is the parasitic infestation of the body of a live mammal by fly larvae (maggots) that grow inside the host while feeding on its tissue. Although flies are most commonly attracted to open wounds and urine- or feces-soaked fur, some species (including the most common myiatic flies, the botfly, blowfly and screwfly) can create an infestation even on unbroken skin and have even been known to use moist soil and non-myiatic flies (such as the common housefly) as vector agents for their parasitic larvae. This diagnosis is of the cavity or socket of the skull in which the eye and its appendages are situated.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B87

    ----------------------

    Onchocerciasis of the skin

    A condition of the skin, caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Onchocerca volvulus. This condition is characterized by subcutaneous nodules containing the parasitic worm (commonly affecting the iliac crests, ribs, knees, or tochranters). Transmission is through the bite of an infected Simulium fly. Confirmation is by identification of Onchocerca volvulus in a skin sample.

    Additional Information

    Onchocercomas are fibrous, subcutaneous nodules containing adult worms. These nodules are generally located over bony prominences and are easily palpable. Nodules are typically located along the iliac crests, ribs, greater trochanters, and ischial tuberosities. They may also be found in juxta-articular areas, such as the knees , elbows, patella, and scalp.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B73

    ----------------------

    Onchocerciasis

    A disease of the eye, caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Onchocerca volvulus. This disease is characterized by transient punctate keratitis, or potentially blinding conditions (such as sclerosing keratitis, iridocyclitis, or optic atrophy). Transmission is through the bite of an infected Simulium fly. Confirmation is by identification of Onchocerca volvulus from the anterior chamber of the eye.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • onchocerciasis with endophthalmitis
  • onchocerciasis with glaucoma
  • Also Known As

  • Ocular onchocerciasis
  • Onchophthalmia
  • River blindness
  • River valley blindness
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B73

    ----------------------

    Onchodermatitis

    Acute papular onchodermatitis (APOD) is characterized by a solid, scattered, pruritic papular rash. The diameter of the papules is at least 1 mm. Vesicles or pustules at the apex may or may not be present. The obliteration of the skin creases due to oedema also may or may not be present.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B73

    ----------------------

    Opisthorchiasis

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Opisthorchis viverrini. This disease is commonly asymptomatic. In mild cases, this disease may present with dyspepsia, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, or constipation; in severe cases, this disease may present with hepatomegaly and malnutrition; in rare cases, this disease may present with cholangitis, cholecystitis, and chlolangiocarcinoma. Transmission is by ingestion of infected undercooked freshwater fish. Confirmation is by identification Opisthorchis viverrini in a faecal sample.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B66.0

    ----------------------

    Parasitic infection of liver

    Active embryos of Echinococcus granulosus grow in the liver, enlarge, produce the hydatid cyst.

    Organ Affected

    Entire liver (body structure)|Liver structure (body structure)

    Causes

    Echinococcus granulosus (organism)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B67.0

    ----------------------

    Parasitic or protozoal encephalitis

    An inflammatory process of the brain, due to infection by Echinoccocus granulosus, most commonly resulting in cyst formation. The clinical manifestations are usually subacute, with fever and variable combinations of convulsions, impaired mental state, and focal deficits. The spinal fluid may show a cellular reaction and elevated protein. Diagnosis is by neuroimaging, spinal fluid analysis, and serologic tests.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B67

    ----------------------

    Parasitic or protozoal meningitis

    A disease of the meninges, caused by an infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. This disease is characterized by headache, abnormal sleep cycles, confusion, or neurological deficits. Transmission is through haematogenous spread to the meninges after a bite from an infected tsetse fly. Confirmation is by identification of Trypanosoma brucei in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or fluid from an infected lymph node.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B56

    ----------------------

    Pediculosis

    A condition of the skin, caused by an infection with the parasite Pediculus humanus corporis. This condition is characterized by pruritus which may lead to sores or thickened discoloured skin. Transmission is by direct or indirect contact with an infected individual or animal. Confirmation is by identification of Pediculus humanus corporis eggs or Pediculus humanus corporis.

    Additional Information

    Infestation by body lice (Pediculus humanus corporis). These are usually to be found along the inner seams of clothing, from which they visit the skin only to feed. Itching is the principal complaint and is the result of sensitization to louse salivary antigens. The body is often covered in excoriations and there may be secondary bacterial infection.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Causes

    Infestation by Anoplura (disorder)|Pediculus humanus corporis

    Also Known As

  • Body-louse infestation
  • Body lice
  • Infestation by Pediculus corporis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B85.1

    ----------------------

    Phthiriasis

    Disseminated infestation by Phthirus pubis not only of the pubic region but also of other hairy areas of the body including eyebrows, eyelashes, beard, axillary and areolar hair. In men with extensive body hair, widespread infestation may occur.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Also Known As

  • Disseminated infestation by pubic lice
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B85.4

    ----------------------

    Predominantly sexually transmitted infections

    A disease caused by an infection with the protozoan parasite Trichomonas. This disease presents with symptoms depending on the site of infection.

    Causes

    Sexual transmission (qualifier value)|Trichomonas vaginalis (organism)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A59

    ----------------------

    Protozoal intestinal infections

    Any condition caused by an infection with the protozoan parasite Balantidium coli.

    Organ Affected

    Entire intestine (body structure)

    Causes

    Balantidium coli (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • balantidium coli anaemia
  • Also Known As

  • Balantidiasis
  • balantidium coli infection
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A07.0

    ----------------------

    Rhodesiense trypanosomiasis

    This is an acute inflammation of the brain, in several diseases in vertebrates caused by parasitic protozoan trypanosomes of the genus Trypanosoma.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B56.1

    ----------------------

    Risk factors related to personal history of health problems

    A condition characterized by previous history of an infectious disease from a bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic source.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • history of infectious disease or disorder
  • history of parasitic disease or disorder
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code Z86.1

    ----------------------

    Schistosomiasis

    A disease caused by an infection with the parasitic worm Schistosoma haematobium. This disease is characterized by haematuria, scarring, calcification, or squamous cell carcinoma. This disease may also present with embolic egg granulomas in the brain or spinal cord. Transmission is by direct contact with freshwater that has been contaminated with Schistosoma haematobium eggs or snails that carry Schistosoma haematobium.

    Organ Affected

    Urinary system structure (body structure)

    Causes

    Schistosoma haematobium

    Abbreviated Terms

  • schistosoma haematobium infection
  • Infection due to Schistosoma matthei
  • haematochyluria in schistosomiasis
  • Also Known As

  • genitourinary bilharziasis
  • genitourinary tract schistosomiasis
  • Schistosomiasis due to Schistosoma haematobium [urinary schistosomiasis]
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B65.0

    ----------------------

    Strongyloidiasis

    Gastric inflammation caused by infection by a small parasitic roundworm called Strongyloides stercoralis.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B78

    ----------------------

    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B83.3

    ----------------------

    Taeniasis

    A disease of the intestines, caused by an infection with the adult parasitic worm Taenia solium. This disease is characterized by abdominal pain, weight loss, diarrhoea, constipation, or may be asymptomatic. Transmission is by ingestion of larval cysts in undercooked pork. Confirmation is by identification of Taenia solium eggs or proglottidis in faecal samples (samples from multiple days).

    Causes

    Taenia solium (organism)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • adult pork tapeworm infection
  • adult pork tapeworm
  • Also Known As

  • Taenia solium taeniasis
  • pork tapeworm infection
  • armed tapeworm infection
  • infection by taenia solium
  • intestinal taenia solium infection
  • pork tapeworm
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B68.0

    ----------------------

    Toxocariasis

    This an inflammation of the internal coats of the eye. This diagnosis is in an illness of humans caused by a larvae (immature worms) of either the dog roundworm (Toxocara canis), the cat roundworm (Toxocara cati) or the fox (Toxocara canis).

    Abbreviated Terms

  • toxocara endophthalmitis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B83.0

    ----------------------

    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code B75

    ----------------------

    Trichomoniasis

    This refers to intestinal infection by the flagellate protozoan parasite Trichomonas.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • trichomonas hominis infection
  • trichomonal diarrhoea
  • trichomonal dysentery
  • trichomonal colitis
  • Also Known As

  • intestinal infection by trichomonas
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code A59

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