Facial Injuries and Disorders

Face injuries and disorders can cause pain and affect how you look. In severe cases, they can affect sight, speech, breathing and your ability to swallow. Broken bones, especially the bones of your nose, cheekbone and jaw, are common facial injuries.

Certain diseases also lead to facial disorders. For example, nerve diseases like trigeminal neuralgia or Bell's palsy sometimes cause facial pain, spasms and trouble with eye or facial movement. Birth defects can also affect the face. They can cause underdeveloped or unusually prominent facial features or a lack of facial expression. Cleft lip and palate are a common facial birth defect.

Different Conditions

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Related ICD 10 COde
ICD 10 Code A66.5

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Birth injury to cranial nerves

Facial palsy involving both upper and lower halves of the face caused by traumatic compression of the facial nerve as it exits the stylomastoid foramen, or as it passes over the ramus of the mandible.

Organ Affected

Facial nerve structure (body structure)

Causes

Birth (finding)

Abbreviated Terms

  • Facial palsy due to birth injury
  • newborn facial nerve paralysis
  • newborn facial palsy
  • newborn facial paralysis
  • geniculate ganglionitis in newborn
  • injury of facial nerve, newborn
  • paralysis of facial nerve, birth injury
  • facial paralysis, birth injury
  • Also Known As

  • facial nerve injury due to birth trauma
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code P11.3

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    Abbreviated Terms

  • crushed face
  • crushed cheek
  • crushed nose
  • Also Known As

  • crush injury of face
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code S07.0

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    Disorders of cranial nerves

    The facial nerve is predominantly a motor nerve, supplying all the muscles concerned with facial expression on one side. The gustatory division is small, carrying taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of tongue. Afferent sensory fibres transmit sensation from the anterior wall of the external auditory canal and soft palate. Parasympathetic fibres innervate the lacrimal gland through the great superficial petrosal nerve and to the sublingual and submaxillary gland through the chorda tympani. The facial nerve follows a course from the pons to the internal auditory meatus, along with the acoustic nerve. The nerve continues its course in the facial canal and exists through the stylomastoid foramen, then passes through the parotid gland and subdivides to supply the facial muscles.

    Organ Affected

    Facial nerve structure (body structure)

    Also Known As

  • Neuropathy of facial nerve
  • Disorders of 7th cranial nerve
  • Disorders of the seventh cranial nerve
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code G51

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    Disorders of facial nerve

    This rare disorder, also known as Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, is characterized by a triad of clinical features of facial nerve palsy, granulomatous cheilitis with chronic swelling and fissuring of the lips, and fissuring of the dorsum of the tongue.

    Organ Affected

    Facial nerve structure (body structure)

    Also Known As

  • Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code G51.2

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    Disorders of trigeminal nerve

    This is a chronic pain of the face, which does not meet other diagnostic criteria.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Pain (finding)
  • Organ Affected

    Trigeminal nerve structure (body structure)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • atypical tic douloureux
  • Also Known As

  • atypical face pain
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code G50.1

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    Abbreviated Terms

  • injury of gasserian ganglion
  • Also Known As

  • injury of fifth cranial nerve
  • trigeminal (5th) nerve injury
  • injury of n.trigeminus
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code S04.3

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