Hair Loss

You lose up to 100 hairs from your scalp every day. That's normal, and in most people, those hairs grow back. But many men -- and some women -- lose hair as they grow older. You can also lose your hair if you have certain diseases, such as thyroid problems, diabetes, or lupus. If you take certain medicines or have chemotherapy for cancer, you may also lose your hair. Other causes are stress, a low protein diet, a family history, or poor nutrition.

Treatment for hair loss depends on the cause. In some cases, treating the underlying cause will correct the problem. Other treatments include medicines and hair restoration.

Different Conditions

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Alopecia areata

Loss of eyebrows (superciliary madarosis) due to alopecia areata
Related ICD 10 COde
ICD 10 Code L63

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Alopecia or hair loss

A microscopically inflammatory, usually reversible, patchy hair loss occurring in sharply defined areas and usually involving the beard or scalp

Signs And Symptoms

  • Alopecia (disorder)
  • Loss of hair (finding)
  • Organ Affected

    Hair structure (body structure)
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L63

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    Anagen effluvium

    Anagen effluvium due most commonly to the toxic effects of heavy metals such as arsenic.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L65.1

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    Central centrifugal scarring alopecia

    A form of Central centrifugal scarring alopecia which cna be attributed to the use of hot combs for hair straightening.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L66

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    Chronic telogen hair shedding secondary to specified cause

    Chronic diffuse telogen hair loss attributable to profound iron deficiency

    Also Known As

  • Alopecia secondary to iron deficiency
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L65.0

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    Female pattern hair loss

    Androgen-mediated hair loss in women. It differs from male pattern hair loss not only in being generally less pronounced than in men but also by the fact that the normal frontal hair line is usually preserved. A quarter of women will develop clinically detectable pattern hair loss by the age of 70.

    Also Known As

  • female androgenetic alopecia
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L64

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    Focal primary cutaneous mucinosis

    Follicular mucinosis is a cutaneous reaction pattern characterized clinically by infiltrated plaques with prominent hair follicles, from which mucin can sometimes be expressed, and loss of hair; and histologically by the accumulation of acid glycosaminoglycans in the sebaceous gland and the outer root sheath of the follicle. The clinical appearances are varied with few or many papules or plaques confined to a localized area or widely distributed. The causes are poorly understood but a proportion of cases are associated with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and this possibility must be excluded before a diagnosis of idiopathic follicular mucinosis can be made.

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Also Known As

  • Alopecia mucinosa
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L65.2

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    Follicular lichen planus

    An inflammatory form of follicular lichen planus which may affect any hairy part of the body. It most commonly affects the scalp but, in the Graham-Little syndrome, it also affects the trunk, axillae and pubic areas with the widespread development of horny keratotic follicular spines. Scalp, axillary and pubic hair is lost.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Alopecia (disorder)
  • Loss of hair (finding)
  • Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Organ Affected

    Hair structure (body structure)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Graham-Little syndrome
  • Lassueur-Graham-Little syndrome
  • Piccardi-Lasseur-Little syndrome
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L66.1

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    Keratosis pilaris atrophicans

    Atrophoderma vermiculatum is a variant of keratoses pilaris atrophicans in which multiple keratotic follicular papules appear on the cheeks, upper lip, and forehead during mid childhood and then resolve with reticulate atrophic scarring resembling honeycomb. In contrast to other forms of keratoses pilaris atrophicans there is no involvement of the eyebrows, eyelashes or scalp. Progression stops after puberty.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Inflammation (qualifier value)
  • Inflammation (morphologic abnormality)
  • Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Organ Affected

    Hair follicle structure (body structure)

    Also Known As

  • Honeycomb atrophy of face
  • Vermiculate atrophoderma of face
  • Folliculitis ulerythematosa reticulata
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L66.4

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    Nail involvement in miscellaneous specified disorders

    Fine nail pitting in association with alopecia areata.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L63

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    Scarring alopecia due to inflammatory disorders

    Pseudopelade (Brocq) is a chronic, slowly progressive, patchy scarring alopecia of the scalp that develops without any clinical evidence of inflammation, though histologically there may initially be a low grade infiltration of lymphocytes around the hair follicle. Many cases are thought to represent an insidious form of follicular lichen planus of the scalp. It presents with multiple small smooth patches of alopecia within which follicular ostia cannot be discerned.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Alopecia (disorder)
  • Loss of hair (finding)
  • Organ Affected

    Hair structure (body structure)

    Also Known As

  • Pseudopelade of Brocq
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L66.0

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    Scarring alopecia due to malignant infiltration

    Scarring alopecia occurring in mycosis fungoides due to malignant T cell infiltration of hair follicles associated with mucinous degeneration of follicles

    Where It Occurs

    Skin System (Integumentary System)

    Also Known As

  • Follicular mucinosis associated with mycosis fungoides
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L65.2

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    Scarring alopecia due to trauma

    Traction alopecia is a form of permanent scarring alopecia brought about by hair styles that impose sustained pulling on the hair roots. The clinical features in the many variants of this syndrome include folliculitis, hair casts, reduction in hair density with vellus hairs and sometimes broken hairs in the affected areas, and eventually scarring alopecia. Traction alopecia is seen most commonly in African and Afro-Caribbean hair styles where the hair is tightly braided. The hair loss commonly begins in the temporal regions and in front of and above the ears, but may involve other parts of the scalp.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L66

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L66

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    Telogen effluvium

    A physiological phenomenon in which diffuse hair loss occurs two to three months following parturition. It is due to a postponement of the normal cyclical conversion of anagen hairs to telogen during pregnancy. After parturition a large number of anagen hairs are converted simultaneously to telogen and shed two to three months later. Normal hair cycling is then resumed.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code L65.0

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