Pain

Pain is a feeling triggered in the nervous system. Pain may be sharp or dull. It may come and go, or it may be constant. You may feel pain in one area of your body, such as your back, abdomen, chest, or pelvis. Or you may feel pain all over, such as when your muscles ache from the flu.

Pain can be helpful in diagnosing a problem. Without pain, you might seriously hurt yourself without knowing it, or you might not realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain usually goes away. However, sometimes pain goes on for weeks, months or even years. This is called chronic pain. Sometimes chronic pain is due to an ongoing cause, such as cancer or arthritis. Sometimes the cause is unknown.

Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain relievers, acupuncture, and sometimes surgery are helpful.

Different Conditions

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Related ICD 10 COde
ICD 10 Code M79.2

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Certain joint disorders, not elsewhere classified

Arthralgia secondary to inflammation, cartilage degeneration, crystal deposition, infection, and trauma not detailed in or used in conjunction with other codes (?)

Abbreviated Terms

  • coxalgia
  • metacarpophalangeal joint pain
  • metatarsophalangeal joint pain
  • polyarthralgia
  • metacarpophalangeal pain
  • metatarsophalangeal pain
  • Also Known As

  • arthralgia
  • arthrodynia
  • articular pain
  • joint pain
  • pain in joint, site unspecified
  • painful joint
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code M25.5

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    Chronic pain

    Chronic neuropathic pain is chronic pain caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system. The pain may be spontaneous or evoked, as an increased response to a painful stimulus (hyperalgesia) or a painful response to a normally nonpainful stimulus (allodynia). The diagnosis of chronic neuropathic pain requires a history of nervous system injury or disease and a neuroanatomically plausible distribution of the pain. Negative (e.g., decreased or loss of sensation) and positive sensory symptoms or signs (e.g., allodynia or hyperalgesia) indicating the involvement of the somatosensory nervous system must be compatible with the innervation territory of the affected nervous structure.

    Additional Information

    Chronic neuropathic pain is chronic pain caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory nervous system [1]. The somatosensory nervous system provides information about the body including skin, musculoskeletal and visceral organs. A lesion or disease causing neuropathic pain may involve peripheral or central structures of the somatosensory nervous system. Persistence or recurrence over ? 3 months defines chronic pain (see 6 Temporal Properties). The pain may be spontaneous (continuous or episodic) or evoked, as an increased response to a painful stimulus (hyperalgesia) or a painful response to a normally nonpainful stimulus (allodynia). The diagnosis of neuropathic pain requires a history of nervous system injury, e.g., by a stroke, nerve trauma or disease, e.g., diabetic neuropathy, and a neuroanatomically plausible distribution of the pain [2]. Negative (e.g., decreased or loss of sensation) and positive sensory symptoms or signs (e.g., allodynia or hyperalgesia) must be compatible with the innervation territory of the affected nervous structure. Demonstration of the lesion or disease involving the nervous system, e.g., by imaging techniques neurophysiological or laboratory tests, confirms the diagnosis of definite neuropathic pain [2].

    Abbreviated Terms

  • anaesthesia dolorosa
  • neuralgia
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code R52

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    Complex regional pain syndrome type II

    A persistent burning pain secondary to partiel nerve damage

    Organ Affected

    Upper limb structure (body structure)|Entire upper limb (body structure)

    Also Known As

  • causalgia syndrome
  • deafferentation pain
  • causalgia NOS
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code R52

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    Disorders of trigeminal nerve

    This is a chronic pain of the face, which does not meet other diagnostic criteria.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Pain (finding)
  • Organ Affected

    Trigeminal nerve structure (body structure)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • atypical tic douloureux
  • Also Known As

  • atypical face pain
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code G50.1

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    Signs And Symptoms

  • Pain (finding)
  • Abbreviated Terms

  • pain not referable to any one organ or body region
  • generalised pain
  • generalised pain, NOS
  • Also Known As

  • pain observations
  • pain NOS
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code R52

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    Otalgia or effusion of ear

    Pain in one or both ears.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • mastoid pain
  • mastoidalgia
  • ear neuralgia
  • Also Known As

  • ear ache
  • earache symptom
  • pain in ear
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code H92.0

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    Pain

    Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage. Chronic pain is pain that persists or recurs for longer than 3 months.

    Additional Information

    Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage. Often, pain serves as a symptom warning of a medical condition or injury. In these cases, treatment of the underlying medical condition is crucial and may resolve the pain. However, pain may persist despite successful management of the condition that initially caused it, or because the underlying medical condition cannot be treated successfully.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code R52

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    Phantom limb syndrome

    Phantom limb pain is the sensation of pain in a limb that has been amputated or in a body part that has been surgically removed. Phantom limb pain occurs in up to 80% of individuals who undergo amputation. The pain can be excruciating, is refractory to treatment and may be related to a certain position or movement of the phantom and may be elicited or exacerbated by a range of physical, emotional and psychological factors. The pain can have several different qualities, including stabbing, throbbing, burning and cramping.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Pain (finding)
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code G54.6

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    Signs And Symptoms

  • Pain (finding)
  • Abbreviated Terms

  • sore eye
  • pain in orbital region
  • Also Known As

  • ocular pain, unspecified eye
  • pain in eye
  • ophthalmic pain
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code H57.1

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