Tooth Disorders

Your teeth are made of a hard, bonelike material. Inside the tooth are nerves and blood vessels. You need your teeth for many activities you may take for granted. These include eating, speaking and even smiling. But tooth disorders are nothing to smile about. They include problems such as cavities (also known as tooth decay), infections, and injuries.

The most familiar symptom of a tooth problem is a toothache. Others include worn-down or loose teeth. It's important that you see a dentist if you have any problems with your teeth. Fortunately, you can prevent many tooth disorders by taking care of your teeth and keeping them clean.

Different Conditions

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Related ICD 10 COde
ICD 10 Code K00.5

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Related ICD 10 COde
ICD 10 Code K00.2

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Related ICD 10 COde
ICD 10 Code K00.5

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Abbreviated Terms

  • delayed exfoliation of deciduous tooth
  • delayed shedding of deciduous tooth
  • delayed exfoliation of primary teeth
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K00.6

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    Cementum dysplasia

    Under the cleidocranial dysplasia, the maxilla is smaller than normal in relation to the mandible. The lacrimal and zygonmatic bones may be hypoplastic. Delayed tooth eruption, short, thin, and deformed roots, absence of cementum on the roots of permanent teeth, and the presence of numerous unerupted supernumerary teeth are usually associated. Partial anodontia may occur.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • Hypocementosis
  • hypoplasia of cementum
  • Aplasia and hypoplasia of cementum
  • aplasia of cementum
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K00

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    Certain specified diseases of hard tissues of teeth

    Theoretical concept of loss of tooth structure not caused by dental caries

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Abfraction
  • Where It Occurs

    Digestive System

    Organ Affected

    Tooth structure

    Causes

    Abfraction

    Abbreviated Terms

  • non-carious cervical lesion
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K03

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    Dentine dysplasia

    In type 2 the pulp chamber of the deciduous teeth become completely obliterated, which the permanent teeth displays large pulp chamber in the coronal portion of the tooth - referred to as thistle tube appearance and pulp stones may be found.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K00.5

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    Dentinogenesis imperfecta

    A hereditary disorder of tooth development , transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, and characterized by discoloration of the teeth, ranging from dusky blue to brownish, poorly formed dentin with an abnormally low mineral content, obliteration of the pulp canal, and normal enamel. The teeth usually wear down rapidly, leaving short, brown stumps. Called also d. hypoplastic hereditaria, Capdepont-Hodge syndrome, Capdepont??????s syndrome, Fargin-Fayelle syndrome, hereditary dark teeth, hereditary opalescent dentin, hereditary opalescent teeth, odontogenesis imperfect, Stainton-Capdepont syndrome,and Stainton syndrome. Type 1 is related to cementogenesis imperfecta and osteogenesia imperfect.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K00.5

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    Signs And Symptoms

  • Hypercementosis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K03

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    Diseases of pulp or periapical tissues

    This is an acute or chronic inflammation of dental pulp, associated with a circumscribed collection of necrotic tissue and pus arising from breakdown of leukocytes and bacteria, sometimes walled off with connective tissue.

    Additional Information

    Localized areas of infection, such as an abscess with pus, may develop within the pulp tissue. Abscesses may be found in teeth in which restorations have been placed or in teeth having no detectable lesion. They can produce severe, intermittent pain that may increase when the patient lies down.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Pulpal abscess
  • Pulpal abscess
  • Where It Occurs

    Digestive System

    Organ Affected

    Structure of pulp of tooth

    Causes

    Pulpal abscess

    Abbreviated Terms

  • pulpal abscess of tooth
  • dental pulp abscess
  • Also Known As

  • Pulpal abscess
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K04

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    Diseases of teeth, gingiva and dentofacial anomalies

    Alteration of the normal formation process of the tooth, the normal chronology of eruption into the mouth or the proper alignment in the dental arch affecting a single or multiple teeth.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • late tooth eruption
  • Delayed generalized tooth eruption due to systemic disease (disorder)
  • Delayed generalized tooth eruption unrelated to systemic disease (disorder)
  • Where It Occurs

    Digestive System

    Organ Affected

    Tooth structure (body structure)|Entire tooth (body structure)

    Causes

    Delayed generalized tooth eruption due to systemic disease|Delayed generalized tooth eruption unrelated to systemic disease

    Abbreviated Terms

  • ectopic eruption
  • passive eruption
  • Disorder of odontogenesis NOS
  • Also Known As

  • disorder of tooth development
  • tooth development disorder
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K00

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    Dislocation or strain or sprain of joints or ligaments of head

    This is a violent shift of a tooth with damage of a periodontium. Partial or complete detachment of a tooth from its socket.

    Organ Affected

    Tooth structure (body structure)|Entire tooth (body structure)

    Causes

    Injury due to exposure to external cause (disorder)

    Abbreviated Terms

  • avulsion of tooth
  • Also Known As

  • luxation of tooth
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code S03.2

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K00

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    Abbreviated Terms

  • Natal teeth
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K00.6

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    Disturbances in tooth formation

    Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia is a rare disorder characterized by unilateral enlargement of the right or left maxillary alveolar bone and gingiva in the region from the back of the canines to the maxillary tuberosity. In the enlarged region, dental abnormalities such as missing teeth, abnormal spacing and delayed eruption occur.

    Additional Information

    Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia (SOD) is a rare disorder characterized by unilateral enlargement of the right or left maxillary alveolar bone and gingiva in the region from the back of the canines to the maxillary tuberosity. In the enlarged region, dental abnormalities such as missing teeth, abnormal spacing and delayed eruption occur. The term segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia was introduced by Danforth et al. in 1990. Up to 2005, 32 cases of SOD had been described. SOD is often diagnosed in childhood both in males and females. The main clinical features include: 1) an alveolar process characterized by unilateral enlargement of the maxillary alveolar bone and gingiva. Buccal as well as palatal enlargement of the alveolar bone is observed, although it is more pronounced on the buccal side. 2) Dentition is marked by abnormal spacing between erupted primary molars and adjacent teeth. The first permanent molars are often distally displaced. A depression in the palate can appear in the molar region. The canines erupt normally. Malformations of the primary molars, absence of one or both premolars and delayed eruption of adjacent teeth are regular findings. 3) On radiograph, the bone appears dense and sclerotic. Decreased size of the maxillary sinus in the affected side is observed. 4) Histological findings reveal immature bone with irregular trabecular and basophilic cemental lines resulting from alternating bone resorption and bone formation. Sparse narrow spaces with only a few fat cells are observed. The gingiva shows slight fibrosis without pathological changes. Primary teeth are characterized by enlargement of pulps and an irregular pulp/dentin interface. Tubular defects in the coronal dentine are present. A deficient osteoblast layer and widespread external resorption is also observed. The etiology of SOD remains unknown. There is however a vascular theory for the origin of regional odontodysplasia. The condition does not appear to be inherited. SOD is apparently a non progressive developmental disorder. Differential diagnosis includes hemimaxillofacial dysplasia (HMD), regional odontodysplasia, fibrous dysplasia, focal cemento-osseous dysplasia, and hemifacial hyperplasia. In HMD, ipsilateral facial hypertrichosis is present in addition to the SOD symptoms. Some authors consider SOD and HMD to be different manifestations of the same syndrome. Regional odontodysplasia is characterized by delayed eruption or failure of eruption of discoloured and atypically shaped teeth. It is similar to SOD, but the incisors and canines of the permanent dentition are commonly involved and agenesis of premolars is not a typical feature. In regional odontodysplasia the radiographic appearance is described as teeth showing poorly demarcated enamel and dentition with a blotchy appearance. The pulp chambers are large and the roots short with open apices. Both primary and permanent teeth are said to be affected in this condition. Fibrous dysplasia also causes enlargement of bone tissue, but in this case affected bone growth is out of proportion with that of unaffected bones, and tooth malformations and missing premolars are not characteristics of the disease. Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia occurs in adults. Gingival enlargements and absence of teeth does not occur. Hemifacial hyperplasia results in unilateral facial enlargement and precocious eruption and enlarged teeth in the affected region. Absence of premolars has not been reported. Treatement of SOD should include long-term follow-up as it is important for guidance in the management of this disorder. Due to the possibility of a vascular origin for regional odontodysplasia, all patients with this syndrome must be carefully examined in the face and neck region for vascular malformations of any type, bearing in mind that vascular skin lesions (birthmarks) may fade during childhood. Implants have been successful in one reported case.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K00.4

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    Abbreviated Terms

  • fitting of dentures
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code Z46.3

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    Fluoride related opacities or lesions

    Enamel fluorosis is a developmental disturbance of dental enamel during the time of formation as result of fluoride exposure above optimal concentration.

    Signs And Symptoms

  • Generalized enamel hypoplasia associated with fluorosis
  • Where It Occurs

    Digestive System

    Organ Affected

    Dentition

    Causes

    Exposure to fluoride above optimal concentration during tooth formation

    Abbreviated Terms

  • intrinsic enamel discoloration of fluorosis
  • dental fluorosis
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K00

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    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K00.5

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    Pathological resorption of teeth

    External resorption is a pathological condition which may be associated to inflammatory, traumatic, mechanical, neoplastic or systemic conditions.

    Abbreviated Terms

  • external resorption of root of tooth
  • Also Known As

  • pathological external tooth resorption
  • Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K03.3

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    Periapical abscess

    Purulent periapical lesion resulting from necrosis of dental pulpal tissues and that has penetrated facial soft and bone tissues.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K04

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    Pulpitis

    Irreversible inflammation of the dental pulp accompanied by production of pus
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K04.0

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    Root anomaly

    A tooth abnormality characterized by the presence of an excessive number of roots, occurring most commonly in teeth which are normally single-rooted, such as the mandibular bicuspids and cuspids.
    Related ICD 10 COde
    ICD 10 Code K00

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